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Title: Consistent modelling of wind turbine noise propagation from source to receiver

Abstract

The unsteady nature of wind turbine noise is a major reason for annoyance. The variation of far-field sound pressure levels is not only caused by the continuous change in wind turbine noise source levels but also by the unsteady flow field and the ground characteristics between the turbine and receiver. To take these phenomena into account, a consistent numerical technique that models the sound propagation from the source to receiver is developed. Large eddy simulation with an actuator line technique is employed for the flow modelling and the corresponding flow fields are used to simulate sound generation and propagation. The local blade relative velocity, angle of attack, and turbulence characteristics are input to the sound generation model. Time-dependent blade locations and the velocity between the noise source and receiver are considered within a quasi-3D propagation model. Long-range noise propagation of a 5 MW wind turbine is investigated. Sound pressure level time series evaluated at the source time are studied for varying wind speeds, surface roughness, and ground impedances within a 2000 m radius from the turbine.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [3]
  1. Technical University of Denmark (Denmark). Department of Wind Energy
  2. Yangzhou University (China). School of Hydraulic, Energy and Power Engineering
  3. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States). National Wind Technology Center
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1416712
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5000-69022
Journal ID: ISSN 0001-4966
Grant/Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 142; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 0001-4966
Publisher:
Acoustical Society of America
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; wind turbines; acoustic signal processing; acoustical properties; flow instabilities; sound generation

Citation Formats

Barlas, Emre, Zhu, Wei Jun, Shen, Wen Zhong, Dag, Kaya O., and Moriarty, Patrick J. Consistent modelling of wind turbine noise propagation from source to receiver. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1121/1.5012747.
Barlas, Emre, Zhu, Wei Jun, Shen, Wen Zhong, Dag, Kaya O., & Moriarty, Patrick J. Consistent modelling of wind turbine noise propagation from source to receiver. United States. doi:10.1121/1.5012747.
Barlas, Emre, Zhu, Wei Jun, Shen, Wen Zhong, Dag, Kaya O., and Moriarty, Patrick J. 2017. "Consistent modelling of wind turbine noise propagation from source to receiver". United States. doi:10.1121/1.5012747. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1416712.
@article{osti_1416712,
title = {Consistent modelling of wind turbine noise propagation from source to receiver},
author = {Barlas, Emre and Zhu, Wei Jun and Shen, Wen Zhong and Dag, Kaya O. and Moriarty, Patrick J.},
abstractNote = {The unsteady nature of wind turbine noise is a major reason for annoyance. The variation of far-field sound pressure levels is not only caused by the continuous change in wind turbine noise source levels but also by the unsteady flow field and the ground characteristics between the turbine and receiver. To take these phenomena into account, a consistent numerical technique that models the sound propagation from the source to receiver is developed. Large eddy simulation with an actuator line technique is employed for the flow modelling and the corresponding flow fields are used to simulate sound generation and propagation. The local blade relative velocity, angle of attack, and turbulence characteristics are input to the sound generation model. Time-dependent blade locations and the velocity between the noise source and receiver are considered within a quasi-3D propagation model. Long-range noise propagation of a 5 MW wind turbine is investigated. Sound pressure level time series evaluated at the source time are studied for varying wind speeds, surface roughness, and ground impedances within a 2000 m radius from the turbine.},
doi = {10.1121/1.5012747},
journal = {Journal of the Acoustical Society of America},
number = 5,
volume = 142,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
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