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Title: The food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni responds to the bile salt deoxycholate with countermeasures to reactive oxygen species

Abstract

In this study, bile plays an important role in digestion, absorption of fats, and the excretion of waste products, while concurrently providing a critical barrier against colonization by harmful bacteria. Previous studies have demonstrated that gut pathogens react to bile by adapting their protein synthesis. The ability of pathogens to respond to bile is remarkably complex and still incompletely understood. Here we show that Campylobacter jejuni, a leading bacterial cause of human diarrheal illness worldwide, responds to deoxycholate, a component of bile, by altering global gene transcription in a manner consistent with a strategy to mitigate exposure to reactive oxygen stress. More specifically, continuous growth of C. jejuni in deoxycholate was found to: induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS); decrease succinate dehydrogenase activity (complex II of the electron transport chain); increase catalase activity that is involved in H 2O 2 breakdown; and result in DNA strand breaks. Congruently, by adding 4-hydroxy-TEMPO (TEMPOL), a superoxide dismutase mimic, that reacts with superoxide to cultures under deoxycholate-mediated ROS stress, C. jejuni growth in the presence of deoxycholate was rescued. We postulate that continuous exposure of a number of enteric pathogens to deoxycholate stimulates a conserved survival response to this stressor.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2];  [1]
  1. Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1416687
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-122926
Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322; WN9030198
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Proteomics; RNA-Seq; Transcriptomics

Citation Formats

Negretti, Nicholas M., Gourley, Christopher R., Clair, Geremy, Adkins, Joshua N., and Konkel, Michael E. The food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni responds to the bile salt deoxycholate with countermeasures to reactive oxygen species. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-15379-5.
Negretti, Nicholas M., Gourley, Christopher R., Clair, Geremy, Adkins, Joshua N., & Konkel, Michael E. The food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni responds to the bile salt deoxycholate with countermeasures to reactive oxygen species. United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-15379-5.
Negretti, Nicholas M., Gourley, Christopher R., Clair, Geremy, Adkins, Joshua N., and Konkel, Michael E. Mon . "The food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni responds to the bile salt deoxycholate with countermeasures to reactive oxygen species". United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-15379-5. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1416687.
@article{osti_1416687,
title = {The food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni responds to the bile salt deoxycholate with countermeasures to reactive oxygen species},
author = {Negretti, Nicholas M. and Gourley, Christopher R. and Clair, Geremy and Adkins, Joshua N. and Konkel, Michael E.},
abstractNote = {In this study, bile plays an important role in digestion, absorption of fats, and the excretion of waste products, while concurrently providing a critical barrier against colonization by harmful bacteria. Previous studies have demonstrated that gut pathogens react to bile by adapting their protein synthesis. The ability of pathogens to respond to bile is remarkably complex and still incompletely understood. Here we show that Campylobacter jejuni, a leading bacterial cause of human diarrheal illness worldwide, responds to deoxycholate, a component of bile, by altering global gene transcription in a manner consistent with a strategy to mitigate exposure to reactive oxygen stress. More specifically, continuous growth of C. jejuni in deoxycholate was found to: induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS); decrease succinate dehydrogenase activity (complex II of the electron transport chain); increase catalase activity that is involved in H2O2 breakdown; and result in DNA strand breaks. Congruently, by adding 4-hydroxy-TEMPO (TEMPOL), a superoxide dismutase mimic, that reacts with superoxide to cultures under deoxycholate-mediated ROS stress, C. jejuni growth in the presence of deoxycholate was rescued. We postulate that continuous exposure of a number of enteric pathogens to deoxycholate stimulates a conserved survival response to this stressor.},
doi = {10.1038/s41598-017-15379-5},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Nov 13 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Nov 13 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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