skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: A Stable Graphitic, Nanocarbon-Encapsulated, Cobalt-Rich Core-Shell Electrocatalyst as an Oxygen Electrode in a Water Electrolyzer

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Department of Energy Science & Engineering, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science & Technology (DGIST), Daegu 42988 Republic of Korea
  2. Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1416645
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Energy Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-01-11 12:32:04; Journal ID: ISSN 1614-6832
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Sivanantham, Arumugam, Ganesan, Pandian, Estevez, Luis, McGrail, B. Peter, Motkuri, Radha Kishan, and Shanmugam, Sangaraju. A Stable Graphitic, Nanocarbon-Encapsulated, Cobalt-Rich Core-Shell Electrocatalyst as an Oxygen Electrode in a Water Electrolyzer. Germany: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1002/aenm.201702838.
Sivanantham, Arumugam, Ganesan, Pandian, Estevez, Luis, McGrail, B. Peter, Motkuri, Radha Kishan, & Shanmugam, Sangaraju. A Stable Graphitic, Nanocarbon-Encapsulated, Cobalt-Rich Core-Shell Electrocatalyst as an Oxygen Electrode in a Water Electrolyzer. Germany. doi:10.1002/aenm.201702838.
Sivanantham, Arumugam, Ganesan, Pandian, Estevez, Luis, McGrail, B. Peter, Motkuri, Radha Kishan, and Shanmugam, Sangaraju. Thu . "A Stable Graphitic, Nanocarbon-Encapsulated, Cobalt-Rich Core-Shell Electrocatalyst as an Oxygen Electrode in a Water Electrolyzer". Germany. doi:10.1002/aenm.201702838.
@article{osti_1416645,
title = {A Stable Graphitic, Nanocarbon-Encapsulated, Cobalt-Rich Core-Shell Electrocatalyst as an Oxygen Electrode in a Water Electrolyzer},
author = {Sivanantham, Arumugam and Ganesan, Pandian and Estevez, Luis and McGrail, B. Peter and Motkuri, Radha Kishan and Shanmugam, Sangaraju},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/aenm.201702838},
journal = {Advanced Energy Materials},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {Germany},
year = {Thu Jan 11 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Thu Jan 11 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on January 11, 2019
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

Save / Share:
  • Sulfur is an appealing cathode material for establishing advanced lithium batteries as it offers a high theoretical capacity of 1675 mA h g -1 at low material and operating costs. However, the lithium–sulfur (Li–S) electrochemical cells face several formidable challenges arising from both the materials chemistry (e.g., low electrochemical utilization of sulfur and severe polysulfide diffusion) and battery chemistry (e.g., dynamic and static instability and low sulfur loadings). Here in this study, we present the design of a core–shell cathode with a pure sulfur core shielded within a conductive shell-shaped electrode. The new electrode configuration allows Li–S cells to loadmore » with a high amount of sulfur (sulfur loadings of up to 30 mg cm -2 and sulfur content approaching 70 wt%). The core–shell cathodes demonstrate a superior dynamic and static electrochemical stability in Li–S cells. The high-loading cathodes exhibit (i) a high sulfur utilization of up to 97% at C/20–C/2 rates and (ii) a low self-discharge during long-term cell storage for a three-month rest period and at different cell-storage conditions. Finally, a polysulfide-trap cell configuration is designed to evidence the eliminations of polysulfide diffusion and to investigate the relationship between the electrode configuration and electrochemical characteristics. Finally, the comprehensive analytical results based on the high-loading cathodes suggest that (i) the core–shell cathode is a promising solution for designing highly reversible Li–S cells and (ii) the polysulfide-trap cell configuration is a viable approach to qualitatively evaluating the presence or absence of polysulfide diffusion.« less
  • With the significant improvement in high temperature creep properties and resistance to radiation damage by addition of nanoscale oxide features, oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic/martensitic alloys are potential candidates for structural applications in nuclear fusion reactors. The structure of the oxygen-rich nanofeatures was analyzed by atom-probe tomography in three ODS alloys: MA957, ODS Fe-12 wt %Cr, and ODS Eurofer-97. Although field evaporation and reconstruction of the precipitates suffer from artefacts, a core/shell structure is found even for very small precipitates. Precipitate cores are Y rich while shell regions are enriched in Ti, Cr, or V depending on alloy composition.