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Title: Utica Shale Energy and Environment Laboratory Final Scientific/Technical Report

Abstract

The Ohio State University (OSU) was awarded a contract on October 1, 2014, from the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) to develop the Utica Shale Energy and Environment Laboratory (USEEL) in the Utica-Point Pleasant shale play of the Appalachian Basin. It was designed to be an environmental and technology development lab that would enable the academic, industry, government, and non-governmental organization (NGO) research communities to better understand unconventional oil and gas (UOG) engineering practices and technology to increase production and safety, and decrease environmental effects. Political and economic consequences necessitated changes in project site location and design, from the Ohio State Eastern Agricultural Research Station (EARS) and the Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District (MWCD) in east-central Ohio to a site located at an Energy Corporation of America (ECA) Marcellus drill pad in Greene County, Pennsylvania. Although the overall project progressed little beyond planning and administration before termination on September 18, 2017, significant research and MS or PhD investigations were completed or continue today. An experimental study design for site specific and regional baseline assessments was developed utilizing ecoregions, United States Geological Survey (USGS) Hydraulic Unit Code watersheds, and GIS technology and databases. This can be utilized to buildmore » a defensible and scalable management and research framework for UOG investigations that can be extrapolated for predictive and comparative analyses. The most commonly mentioned perceived risks of shale energy development identified in a socioeconomic analysis included impacts to the environment and water resources, traffic and road deterioration, and crime. Economic benefits, such as the windfall wealth to residents, job opportunities, and the demand for hotels and restaurants emerged, as the main positive impact to the community. Preliminary results of an analysis of the location and mechanisms for extremely high pore pressures of the deep Utica-Point Pleasant formations of southwestern Pennsylvania and their possible relationship to high initial production rates indicate that the overpressure is caused by a combination disequilibrium compaction and fluid expansion. Drilling fluids research designed a proof-of-concept device to evaluate desalination and solvent separation in hydraulic fracturing flowback water that could facilitate water recycling and potentially mitigate deep-well injection. A groundwater study was devised to characterize the subsurface aquifers in terms of the geological framework and groundwater chemistry, including the chemistry of dissolved gases and salts. Brines and gases associated with hydrocarbon migration in groundwater (including noble gases and hydrocarbons) were to be specifically fingerprinted for use as tracers of fluid migration. Trace element analysis of fish otoliths, using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), is being utilized to assess surface water quality. This methodology will be used to reconstruct the exposure histories of fish from watersheds and discriminate between the signatures associated with hydraulic fracturing and coal mining activities.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE), Oil and Natural Gas (FE-30)
OSTI Identifier:
1416539
Report Number(s):
DOE-OSU-0024357
DOE Contract Number:  
FE0024357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; 58 GEOSCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Oil shale; hydraulic fracturing; unconventional oil and gas; Utica-Point Pleasant shales; Appalachian Basin

Citation Formats

Cole, David Robert, and Allen, Gerald Robert. Utica Shale Energy and Environment Laboratory Final Scientific/Technical Report. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1416539.
Cole, David Robert, & Allen, Gerald Robert. Utica Shale Energy and Environment Laboratory Final Scientific/Technical Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1416539.
Cole, David Robert, and Allen, Gerald Robert. Fri . "Utica Shale Energy and Environment Laboratory Final Scientific/Technical Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1416539. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1416539.
@article{osti_1416539,
title = {Utica Shale Energy and Environment Laboratory Final Scientific/Technical Report},
author = {Cole, David Robert and Allen, Gerald Robert},
abstractNote = {The Ohio State University (OSU) was awarded a contract on October 1, 2014, from the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) to develop the Utica Shale Energy and Environment Laboratory (USEEL) in the Utica-Point Pleasant shale play of the Appalachian Basin. It was designed to be an environmental and technology development lab that would enable the academic, industry, government, and non-governmental organization (NGO) research communities to better understand unconventional oil and gas (UOG) engineering practices and technology to increase production and safety, and decrease environmental effects. Political and economic consequences necessitated changes in project site location and design, from the Ohio State Eastern Agricultural Research Station (EARS) and the Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District (MWCD) in east-central Ohio to a site located at an Energy Corporation of America (ECA) Marcellus drill pad in Greene County, Pennsylvania. Although the overall project progressed little beyond planning and administration before termination on September 18, 2017, significant research and MS or PhD investigations were completed or continue today. An experimental study design for site specific and regional baseline assessments was developed utilizing ecoregions, United States Geological Survey (USGS) Hydraulic Unit Code watersheds, and GIS technology and databases. This can be utilized to build a defensible and scalable management and research framework for UOG investigations that can be extrapolated for predictive and comparative analyses. The most commonly mentioned perceived risks of shale energy development identified in a socioeconomic analysis included impacts to the environment and water resources, traffic and road deterioration, and crime. Economic benefits, such as the windfall wealth to residents, job opportunities, and the demand for hotels and restaurants emerged, as the main positive impact to the community. Preliminary results of an analysis of the location and mechanisms for extremely high pore pressures of the deep Utica-Point Pleasant formations of southwestern Pennsylvania and their possible relationship to high initial production rates indicate that the overpressure is caused by a combination disequilibrium compaction and fluid expansion. Drilling fluids research designed a proof-of-concept device to evaluate desalination and solvent separation in hydraulic fracturing flowback water that could facilitate water recycling and potentially mitigate deep-well injection. A groundwater study was devised to characterize the subsurface aquifers in terms of the geological framework and groundwater chemistry, including the chemistry of dissolved gases and salts. Brines and gases associated with hydrocarbon migration in groundwater (including noble gases and hydrocarbons) were to be specifically fingerprinted for use as tracers of fluid migration. Trace element analysis of fish otoliths, using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), is being utilized to assess surface water quality. This methodology will be used to reconstruct the exposure histories of fish from watersheds and discriminate between the signatures associated with hydraulic fracturing and coal mining activities.},
doi = {10.2172/1416539},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}