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Title: Accurate, rapid identification of dislocation lines in coherent diffractive imaging via a min-max optimization formulation

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439, USA
  2. Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1416468
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
AIP Advances
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-01-10 13:37:49; Journal ID: ISSN 2158-3226
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ulvestad, A., Menickelly, M., and Wild, S. M.. Accurate, rapid identification of dislocation lines in coherent diffractive imaging via a min-max optimization formulation. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5017596.
Ulvestad, A., Menickelly, M., & Wild, S. M.. Accurate, rapid identification of dislocation lines in coherent diffractive imaging via a min-max optimization formulation. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5017596.
Ulvestad, A., Menickelly, M., and Wild, S. M.. 2018. "Accurate, rapid identification of dislocation lines in coherent diffractive imaging via a min-max optimization formulation". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5017596.
@article{osti_1416468,
title = {Accurate, rapid identification of dislocation lines in coherent diffractive imaging via a min-max optimization formulation},
author = {Ulvestad, A. and Menickelly, M. and Wild, S. M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.5017596},
journal = {AIP Advances},
number = 1,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = 2018,
month = 1
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1063/1.5017596

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  • One consequence of the self-amplified stimulated emission process used to generate x rays in free electron lasers (FELs) is the intrinsic shot-to-shot variance in the wavelength and temporal coherence. In order to optimize the results from diffractive imaging experiments at FEL sources, it will be advantageous to acquire a means of collecting coherence and spectral information simultaneously with the diffraction pattern from the sample we wish to study. We present a holographic mask geometry, including a grating structure, which can be used to extract both temporal and spatial coherence information alongside the sample scatter from each individual FEL shot andmore » also allows for the real space reconstruction of the sample using either Fourier transform holography or iterative phase retrieval.« less
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  • The technique of coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) has recently shown great promise for the study of inorganic nanocrystals. In this work the CXDI method has been applied to the study of micrometer-size protein crystals. Finely sampled diffraction patterns of single crystals were measured and iterative phase-retrieval algorithms were used to reconstruct the two-dimensional shape of the crystal. The density maps have limited reproducibility because of radiation damage, but show clear evidence for crystal facets. Qualitative analysis of a number of single-crystal diffraction peaks indicates the presence of inward surface contraction on 2 {micro}m size crystals. A survey of severalmore » hundred diffraction patterns yielded a number of examples with dramatic single-sided streaks, for which a plausible model is constructed.« less
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