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Title: Biotemplated synthesis of inorganic materials: An emerging paradigm for nanomaterial synthesis inspired by nature

Abstract

Biomineralization, the process by which biological systems direct the synthesis of inorganic structures from organic templates, is an exquisite example of nanomaterial self-assembly in nature. Its products include the shells of mollusks and the bones and teeth of vertebrates. By comparison, conventional inorganic synthesis techniques provide limited control over inorganic nanomaterial architecture. Inspired by biomineralization in nature, over the last two decades, the field of biotemplating has emerged as a new paradigm for inorganic nanomaterial assembly, wherein researchers seek to design novel nano-structures in which inorganic nanomaterial synthesis is directed from an underlying biomolecular template. Here, we review the motivation, mechanistic understanding, progress, and challenges for the field of biotemplating. We highlight the interdisciplinary nature of this field, and survey a broad range of examples of bio-templated engineering: ranging from strategies that exploit the inherent capabilities of proteins in nature, to genetically-engineered systems that unlock new capabilities for self-assembly with biomolecules. Here, we illustrate that the use of biological materials as templates for inorganic self-assembly holds tremendous potential for nanomaterial engineering, with applications that range from electronics and energy to medicine.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)
  2. Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1416369
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Progress in Materials Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 91; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0079-6425
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Krajina, Brad A., Proctor, Amy C., Schoen, Alia P., Spakowitz, Andrew J., and Heilshorn, Sarah C.. Biotemplated synthesis of inorganic materials: An emerging paradigm for nanomaterial synthesis inspired by nature. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.pmatsci.2017.08.001.
Krajina, Brad A., Proctor, Amy C., Schoen, Alia P., Spakowitz, Andrew J., & Heilshorn, Sarah C.. Biotemplated synthesis of inorganic materials: An emerging paradigm for nanomaterial synthesis inspired by nature. United States. doi:10.1016/j.pmatsci.2017.08.001.
Krajina, Brad A., Proctor, Amy C., Schoen, Alia P., Spakowitz, Andrew J., and Heilshorn, Sarah C.. Tue . "Biotemplated synthesis of inorganic materials: An emerging paradigm for nanomaterial synthesis inspired by nature". United States. doi:10.1016/j.pmatsci.2017.08.001. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1416369.
@article{osti_1416369,
title = {Biotemplated synthesis of inorganic materials: An emerging paradigm for nanomaterial synthesis inspired by nature},
author = {Krajina, Brad A. and Proctor, Amy C. and Schoen, Alia P. and Spakowitz, Andrew J. and Heilshorn, Sarah C.},
abstractNote = {Biomineralization, the process by which biological systems direct the synthesis of inorganic structures from organic templates, is an exquisite example of nanomaterial self-assembly in nature. Its products include the shells of mollusks and the bones and teeth of vertebrates. By comparison, conventional inorganic synthesis techniques provide limited control over inorganic nanomaterial architecture. Inspired by biomineralization in nature, over the last two decades, the field of biotemplating has emerged as a new paradigm for inorganic nanomaterial assembly, wherein researchers seek to design novel nano-structures in which inorganic nanomaterial synthesis is directed from an underlying biomolecular template. Here, we review the motivation, mechanistic understanding, progress, and challenges for the field of biotemplating. We highlight the interdisciplinary nature of this field, and survey a broad range of examples of bio-templated engineering: ranging from strategies that exploit the inherent capabilities of proteins in nature, to genetically-engineered systems that unlock new capabilities for self-assembly with biomolecules. Here, we illustrate that the use of biological materials as templates for inorganic self-assembly holds tremendous potential for nanomaterial engineering, with applications that range from electronics and energy to medicine.},
doi = {10.1016/j.pmatsci.2017.08.001},
journal = {Progress in Materials Science},
number = C,
volume = 91,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Aug 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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