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Title: Opportunities for increasing CO 2 storage in deep, saline formations by active reservoir management and treatment of extracted formation water: Case study at the GreenGen IGCC facility, Tianjin, PR China

Abstract

Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) seeks beneficial applications for CO 2 recovered from fossil fuel combustion. This study evaluated the potential for removing formation water to create additional storage capacity for CO 2, while simultaneously treating the produced water for beneficial use. Furthermore, the process would control pressures within the target formation, lessen the risk of caprock failure, and better control the movement of CO 2 within that formation. The project plans to highlight the method of using individual wells to produce formation water prior to injecting CO 2 as an efficient means of managing reservoir pressure. Because the pressure drawdown resulting from pre-injection formation water production will inversely correlate with pressure buildup resulting from CO 2 injection, it can be proactively used to estimate CO 2 storage capacity and to plan well-field operations. The project studied the GreenGen site in Tianjin, China where Huaneng Corporation is capturing CO 2 at a coal fired IGCC power plant. Known as the Tianjin Enhanced Water Recovery (EWR) project, local rock units were evaluated for CO 2 storage potential and produced water treatment options were then developed. Average treatment cost for produced water with a cooling water treatment goal ranged from 2.27more » to 2.96 US$/m 3 (recovery 95.25%), and for a boiler water treatment goal ranged from 2.37 to 3.18 US$/m 3 (recovery 92.78%). Importance analysis indicated that water quality parameters and transportation are significant cost factors as the injection-extraction system is managed over time. Our study found that in a broad sense, active reservoir management in the context of CCUS/EWR is technically feasible. In addition, criteria for evaluating suitable vs. unsuitable reservoir properties, reservoir storage (caprock) integrity, a recommended injection/withdrawal strategy and cost estimates for water treatment and reservoir management are proposed.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [4];  [1];  [1];  [3]
  1. West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)
  2. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  3. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  4. Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1416304
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1410847
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-27655
Journal ID: ISSN 1750-5836
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396; PI0000017
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 54; Journal Issue: P2; Journal ID: ISSN 1750-5836
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Earth Sciences; Energy Sciences; Carbon Storage and Utilization

Citation Formats

Ziemkiewicz, Paul, Stauffer, Philip H., Sullivan-Graham, Jeri, Chu, Shaoping P., Bourcier, William L., Buscheck, Thomas A., Carr, Timothy, Donovan, Joseph, Jiao, Zunsheng, Lin, Lianshin, Song, Liaosha, and Wagoner, Jeffrey L. Opportunities for increasing CO 2 storage in deep, saline formations by active reservoir management and treatment of extracted formation water: Case study at the GreenGen IGCC facility, Tianjin, PR China. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.07.039.
Ziemkiewicz, Paul, Stauffer, Philip H., Sullivan-Graham, Jeri, Chu, Shaoping P., Bourcier, William L., Buscheck, Thomas A., Carr, Timothy, Donovan, Joseph, Jiao, Zunsheng, Lin, Lianshin, Song, Liaosha, & Wagoner, Jeffrey L. Opportunities for increasing CO 2 storage in deep, saline formations by active reservoir management and treatment of extracted formation water: Case study at the GreenGen IGCC facility, Tianjin, PR China. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.07.039.
Ziemkiewicz, Paul, Stauffer, Philip H., Sullivan-Graham, Jeri, Chu, Shaoping P., Bourcier, William L., Buscheck, Thomas A., Carr, Timothy, Donovan, Joseph, Jiao, Zunsheng, Lin, Lianshin, Song, Liaosha, and Wagoner, Jeffrey L. Thu . "Opportunities for increasing CO 2 storage in deep, saline formations by active reservoir management and treatment of extracted formation water: Case study at the GreenGen IGCC facility, Tianjin, PR China". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.07.039. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1416304.
@article{osti_1416304,
title = {Opportunities for increasing CO 2 storage in deep, saline formations by active reservoir management and treatment of extracted formation water: Case study at the GreenGen IGCC facility, Tianjin, PR China},
author = {Ziemkiewicz, Paul and Stauffer, Philip H. and Sullivan-Graham, Jeri and Chu, Shaoping P. and Bourcier, William L. and Buscheck, Thomas A. and Carr, Timothy and Donovan, Joseph and Jiao, Zunsheng and Lin, Lianshin and Song, Liaosha and Wagoner, Jeffrey L.},
abstractNote = {Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) seeks beneficial applications for CO2 recovered from fossil fuel combustion. This study evaluated the potential for removing formation water to create additional storage capacity for CO2, while simultaneously treating the produced water for beneficial use. Furthermore, the process would control pressures within the target formation, lessen the risk of caprock failure, and better control the movement of CO2 within that formation. The project plans to highlight the method of using individual wells to produce formation water prior to injecting CO2 as an efficient means of managing reservoir pressure. Because the pressure drawdown resulting from pre-injection formation water production will inversely correlate with pressure buildup resulting from CO2 injection, it can be proactively used to estimate CO2 storage capacity and to plan well-field operations. The project studied the GreenGen site in Tianjin, China where Huaneng Corporation is capturing CO2 at a coal fired IGCC power plant. Known as the Tianjin Enhanced Water Recovery (EWR) project, local rock units were evaluated for CO2 storage potential and produced water treatment options were then developed. Average treatment cost for produced water with a cooling water treatment goal ranged from 2.27 to 2.96 US$/m3 (recovery 95.25%), and for a boiler water treatment goal ranged from 2.37 to 3.18 US$/m3 (recovery 92.78%). Importance analysis indicated that water quality parameters and transportation are significant cost factors as the injection-extraction system is managed over time. Our study found that in a broad sense, active reservoir management in the context of CCUS/EWR is technically feasible. In addition, criteria for evaluating suitable vs. unsuitable reservoir properties, reservoir storage (caprock) integrity, a recommended injection/withdrawal strategy and cost estimates for water treatment and reservoir management are proposed.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.07.039},
journal = {International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control},
number = P2,
volume = 54,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Aug 04 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Thu Aug 04 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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Cited by: 4works
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  • Cited by 4
  • In this report, we present initial estimates of CO 2 injectivity and plume radius for injection of 0.1 MT/yr and 1 MT/yr. Results for 1 and 10 years of injection are used to show how the plume from a single injector well could grow through time for a simplified, idealized system. Most results are for a 2 km deep injection well, while several results from a deeper plume are also presented to demonstrate the impact of changing depth and temperature.
  • Concern about the role of greenhouse gases in global climate change has generated interest in sequestering CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel combustion in deep saline formations. Pore space in these formations is initially filled with brine, and space to accommodate injected CO{sub 2} must be generated by displacing brine, and to a lesser extent by compression of brine and rock. The formation volume required to store a given mass of CO{sub 2} depends on the storage mechanism. We compare the equilibrium volumetric requirements of three end-member processes: CO{sub 2} stored as a supercritical fluid (structural or stratigraphic trapping); CO{sub 2} dissolvedmore » in pre-existing brine (solubility trapping); and CO{sub 2} solubility enhanced by dissolution of calcite. For typical storage conditions, storing CO{sub 2} by solubility trapping reduces the volume required to store the same amount of CO{sub 2} by structural or stratigraphic trapping by about 50%. Accessibility of CO{sub 2} to brine determines which storage mechanism (structural/stratigraphic versus solubility) dominates at a given time, which is a critical factor in evaluating CO{sub 2} volumetric requirements and long-term storage security.« less
  • Concern about the role of greenhouse gases in global climate change has generated interest in sequestering CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel combustion in deep saline formations. Pore space in these formations is initially filled with brine, and space to accommodate injected CO{sub 2} must be generated by displacing brine, and to a lesser extent by compression of brine and rock. The formation volume required to store a given mass of CO{sub 2} depends on the storage mechanism. We compare the equilibrium volumetric requirements of three end-member processes: CO{sub 2} stored as a supercritical fluid (structural or stratigraphic trapping); CO{sub 2} dissolvedmore » in pre-existing brine (solubility trapping); and CO{sub 2} solubility enhanced by dissolution of calcite. For typical storage conditions, storing CO{sub 2} by solubility trapping reduces the volume required to store the same amount of CO{sub 2} by structural or stratigraphic trapping by about 50%. Accessibility of CO{sub 2} to brine determines which storage mechanism (structural/stratigraphic versus solubility) dominates at a given time, which is a critical factor in evaluating CO{sub 2} volumetric requirements and long-term storage security.« less
  • The geological storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is increasing seen as a viable strategy to reduce the release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. There are numerous sedimentary basins in China, in which a number of suitable CO{sub 2} geologic reservoirs are potentially available. To identify the multi-phase processes, geochemical changes and mineral alteration, and CO{sub 2} trapping mechanisms after CO{sub 2} injection, reactive geochemical transport simulations using a simple 2D model were performed. Mineralogical composition and water chemistry from a deep saline formation of Songliao Basin were used. Results indicate that different storage forms of CO{submore » 2} vary with time. In the CO{sub 2} injection period, a large amount of CO{sub 2} remains as a free supercritical phase (gas trapping), and the amount dissolved in the formation water (solubility trapping) gradually increases. Later, gas trapping decreases, solubility trapping increases significantly due to migration and diffusion of the CO{sub 2} plume, and the amount trapped by carbonate minerals increases gradually with time. The residual CO{sub 2} gas keeps dissolving into groundwater and precipitating carbonate minerals. For the Songliao Basin sandstone, variations in the reaction rate and abundance of chlorite, and plagioclase composition affect significantly the estimates of mineral alteration and CO{sub 2} storage in different trapping mechanisms. The effect of vertical permeability and residual gas saturation on the overall storage is smaller compared to the geochemical factors. However, they can affect the spatial distribution of the injected CO{sub 2} in the formations. The CO{sub 2} mineral trapping capacity could be in the order of ten kilogram per cubic meter medium for the Songliao Basin sandstone, and may be higher depending on the composition of primary aluminosilicate minerals especially the content of Ca, Mg, and Fe.« less