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Title: A Review of Global Precipitation Data Sets: Data Sources, Estimation, and Intercomparisons

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2];  [2]
  1. State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Faculty of Geographical Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China
  2. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine CA USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1416236
Grant/Contract Number:
IA0000018; 2016YFC0501604
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Reviews of Geophysics (1985)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Reviews of Geophysics (1985); Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-01-09 17:10:51; Journal ID: ISSN 8755-1209
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Sun, Qiaohong, Miao, Chiyuan, Duan, Qingyun, Ashouri, Hamed, Sorooshian, Soroosh, and Hsu, Kuo-Lin. A Review of Global Precipitation Data Sets: Data Sources, Estimation, and Intercomparisons. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1002/2017RG000574.
Sun, Qiaohong, Miao, Chiyuan, Duan, Qingyun, Ashouri, Hamed, Sorooshian, Soroosh, & Hsu, Kuo-Lin. A Review of Global Precipitation Data Sets: Data Sources, Estimation, and Intercomparisons. United States. doi:10.1002/2017RG000574.
Sun, Qiaohong, Miao, Chiyuan, Duan, Qingyun, Ashouri, Hamed, Sorooshian, Soroosh, and Hsu, Kuo-Lin. 2018. "A Review of Global Precipitation Data Sets: Data Sources, Estimation, and Intercomparisons". United States. doi:10.1002/2017RG000574.
@article{osti_1416236,
title = {A Review of Global Precipitation Data Sets: Data Sources, Estimation, and Intercomparisons},
author = {Sun, Qiaohong and Miao, Chiyuan and Duan, Qingyun and Ashouri, Hamed and Sorooshian, Soroosh and Hsu, Kuo-Lin},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/2017RG000574},
journal = {Reviews of Geophysics (1985)},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2018,
month = 1
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/2017RG000574

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