skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Radical change of Zn speciation in pig slurry amended soil: Key role of nano-sized sulfide particles

Authors:
; ORCiD logo; ORCiD logo; ; ORCiD logo; ; ORCiD logo; ORCiD logo; ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1416196
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Pollution
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 222; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-01-09 02:38:47; Journal ID: ISSN 0269-7491
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Formentini, Thiago Augusto, Legros, Samuel, Fernandes, Cristovão Vicente Scapulatempo, Pinheiro, Adilson, Le Bars, Maureen, Levard, Clément, Mallmann, Fábio Joel Kochem, da Veiga, Milton, and Doelsch, Emmanuel. Radical change of Zn speciation in pig slurry amended soil: Key role of nano-sized sulfide particles. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.envpol.2016.11.056.
Formentini, Thiago Augusto, Legros, Samuel, Fernandes, Cristovão Vicente Scapulatempo, Pinheiro, Adilson, Le Bars, Maureen, Levard, Clément, Mallmann, Fábio Joel Kochem, da Veiga, Milton, & Doelsch, Emmanuel. Radical change of Zn speciation in pig slurry amended soil: Key role of nano-sized sulfide particles. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.envpol.2016.11.056.
Formentini, Thiago Augusto, Legros, Samuel, Fernandes, Cristovão Vicente Scapulatempo, Pinheiro, Adilson, Le Bars, Maureen, Levard, Clément, Mallmann, Fábio Joel Kochem, da Veiga, Milton, and Doelsch, Emmanuel. Wed . "Radical change of Zn speciation in pig slurry amended soil: Key role of nano-sized sulfide particles". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.envpol.2016.11.056.
@article{osti_1416196,
title = {Radical change of Zn speciation in pig slurry amended soil: Key role of nano-sized sulfide particles},
author = {Formentini, Thiago Augusto and Legros, Samuel and Fernandes, Cristovão Vicente Scapulatempo and Pinheiro, Adilson and Le Bars, Maureen and Levard, Clément and Mallmann, Fábio Joel Kochem and da Veiga, Milton and Doelsch, Emmanuel},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.envpol.2016.11.056},
journal = {Environmental Pollution},
number = C,
volume = 222,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.envpol.2016.11.056

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:
  • In a small-plot field study on a Waukegan silt loam soil, annual applications of 20 g N m{sup {minus}2} were made each May for 8 years before planting corn (Zea mays L.). Subplots were fertilized with 0.8 g {sup 15}N m{sup {minus}2}. Soil treatment in the fall either incorporated the chopped corn stover after grain harvest, using a rototiller, or the stover was removed from the plots. Soil samples taken in the fall were ultrasonicated, separated into clay- and silt-sized fractions, and extracted exhaustively with 0.1 mol L{sup {minus}1} sodium pyrophosphate (Na{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}) + 0.1 mol L{sup {minus}1}more » NaOH (pH 12.6). Humic (HA) and fulvic (FA) acids were isolated using the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) procedures. A variety of analytical methods were employed. The most useful information was obtained from amino acid (AA) and neutral sugar (NS) analyses, and from cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) {sup 13}C-NMR and {delta}{sup 13}C data. Overall, the corn residue amendments did not have a large effect on the composition of the humic substances (HS) from the different sized separates, but there were differences in the relative abundance of some AA and NS in the HAs and FAs. The NMR and {delta}{sup 13}C data provided evidence of some compositional differences and extent of humification between the HS from the clay- and silt-sized separates. The conclusion reached is, therefore, that the silt-sized particles were microaggregates of clay-sized particles, and the HS in these microaggregates were partially protected from bioalteration. These HS bore greater resemblance to the plants of origin than did those associated with the clays. The composition of the HAs and that of the FAs were similar to that of the Mollisol soil standard of the IHSS, but they were different from humic samples from other non-Mollisol soil types.« less
  • Spontaneous ignition of a nano-sized aluminum (Al) particles-water slurry using a hot plate was investigated. The aluminum weight fractions were 17% and 27%. The hot plate temperatures ranged from 303 to 343 K. For all experimental conditions used, ignition was observed to occur at about 321 K and it was followed by a rapid temperature increase to above the boiling temperature of the water. Although the thermal runaway condition did not occur until the slurry reached a temperature of 321 K, it was able to react at a temperature as low as 303 K and develops sufficient heat for themore » slurry to reach the ignition condition. The ignition kinetic data were determined showing that E/R = 28619.66 (K) and k = 1.2644 × 10{sup 37} K/s for the slurry containing 17% aluminum and, the value of k was about 2.398 × 10{sup 37} K/s for those having 27% aluminum by weight.« less
  • An acid soil (pH 5.2) was treated +- lime and 1% sewage sludge enriched with three concentrations each of Cd, Zn, Cu, and Ni in a 3/sup 4/ complete factorial design experiment (81 treatments +- lime). These treated soils were placed in pots and cropped with wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Analysis of variance revealed significant main effects on grain yield from all metal additions to the acid soil and from Cd and Cu only in the limed soil. Significant main effects on the concentration of Cd in grain occurred with all metals added in the limed soil, but only frommore » Cd, Zn, and Ni on the acid soil. Significant multiple metal interactions occurred in all cases. Multiple regression equations were developed for estimating grain yield and Cd content from soil metal additions and saturation extract metal content. Grain Cd concentrations were highly correlated with soil metal additions (R/sup 2/ = 0.978 and 0.988 for limed and unlimed soils, respectively) and saturation extract metals (R/sup 2/ = 0.879 and 0.950 for limed and unlimed soils). The best fit equations were used to calculate metal equivalent values for soil metals added (SME) which were then used to develop regression equations and graphs relating grain yield to SME.« less