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Title: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Metocean Data-use, Sources, and Instrumentation

Abstract

Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Metocean Data-use, Sources, and Instrumentation presentation from Water Power Technologies Office Peer Review, FY14-FY16. This project aims to accelerate deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technology by establishing: 1) relevant existing and evolving standards and guidelines, 2) meteorological and oceanic (metocean) data use 3) data sources, and 4) instrumentation guidance for siting, design, and operation of MHK devices along the U.S coastline.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1416137
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-5000-68366
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy Water Power Technologies Office Peer Review, Marine and Hydrokinetics Program, 14-16 February 2017, Arlington, Virginia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
13 HYDRO ENERGY; marine and hydrokinetic; metaocean; data; water power; project life cycle

Citation Formats

Sirnivas, Senu. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Metocean Data-use, Sources, and Instrumentation. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Sirnivas, Senu. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Metocean Data-use, Sources, and Instrumentation. United States.
Sirnivas, Senu. 2018. "Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Metocean Data-use, Sources, and Instrumentation". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1416137.
@article{osti_1416137,
title = {Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Metocean Data-use, Sources, and Instrumentation},
author = {Sirnivas, Senu},
abstractNote = {Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Metocean Data-use, Sources, and Instrumentation presentation from Water Power Technologies Office Peer Review, FY14-FY16. This project aims to accelerate deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technology by establishing: 1) relevant existing and evolving standards and guidelines, 2) meteorological and oceanic (metocean) data use 3) data sources, and 4) instrumentation guidance for siting, design, and operation of MHK devices along the U.S coastline.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2018,
month = 1
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • The ocean-energy industry is still in its infancy and device developers have provided their own equipment and procedures for testing. Currently, no testing standards exist for ocean energy devices in the United States. Furthermore, as prototype devices move from the test tank to in-water testing, the logistical challenges and costs grow exponentially. Development of a common instrumentation package that can be moved from device to device is one means of reducing testing costs and providing normalized data to the industry as a whole. As a first step, the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has initiated an effort to developmore » an instrumentation package to provide a tool to allow common measurements across various ocean energy devices. The effort is summarized in this paper. First, we present the current status of ocean energy devices. We then review the experiences of the wind industry in its development of the instrumentation package and discuss how they can be applied in the ocean environment. Next, the challenges that will be addressed in the development of the ocean instrumentation package are discussed. For example, the instrument package must be highly adaptable to fit a large array of devices but still conduct common measurements. Finally, some possible system configurations are outlined followed by input from the industry regarding its measurement needs, lessons learned from prior testing, and other ideas.« less
  • The world’s oceans and estuaries offer an enormous potential to meet the nation’s growing demand for energy. The use of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices to harness the power of wave and tidal energy could contribute significantly toward meeting federal- and state-mandated renewable energy goals while supplying a substantial amount of clean energy to coastal communities. Locations along the eastern and western coasts of the United States between 40° and 70° north latitude are ideal for MHK deployment, and recent estimates of energy potential for the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California suggest that up to 25 gigawatts could bemore » generated from wave and tidal devices in these areas. Because energy derived from wave and tidal devices is highly predictable, their inclusion in our energy portfolio could help balance available sources of energy production, including hydroelectric, coal, nuclear, wind, solar, geothermal, and others.« less
  • The production of electricity from the moving waters of the ocean has the potential to be a viable addition to the portfolio of renewable energy sources worldwide. The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry faces many hurdles, including technology development, challenges of offshore deployments, and financing; however, the barrier most commonly identified by industry, regulators, and stakeholders is the uncertainty surrounding potential environmental effects of devices placed in the water and the permitting processes associated with real or potential impacts. Regulatory processes are not well positioned to judge the severity of harm due to turbines or wave generators. Risks from MHKmore » devices to endangered or protected animals in coastal waters and rivers, as well as the habitats that support them, are poorly understood. This uncertainty raises concerns about catastrophic interactions between spinning turbine blades or slack mooring lines and marine mammals, birds and fish. In order to accelerate the deployment of tidal and wave devices, there is a need to sort through the extensive list of potential interactions that may cause harm to marine organisms and ecosystems, to set priorities for regulatory triggers, and to direct future research. Identifying the risk of MHK technology components on specific marine organisms and ecosystem components can separate perceived from real risk-relevant interactions. Scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are developing an Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) to assess environmental effects associated with MHK technologies and projects through a systematic analytical process, with specific input from key stakeholder groups. The array of stakeholders interested in the development of MHK is broad, segmenting into those whose involvement is essential for the success of the MHK project, those that are influential, and those that are interested. PNNL and their partners have engaged these groups, gaining valuable information, gathering pertinent feedback on the efficacy of the process, and providing a level of ownership for the risk evaluation process that will encourage adoption of the outcome to inform future MHK siting and permitting decisions. The ERES development process provides the scientific structure to support risk characterization, comparison of tradeoffs, and risk-informed decision-making by project and technology developers, regulatory agencies, and other interested stakeholders. The PNNL team will determine the range and severity of environmental effects of MHK development, leading to the development of mitigation strategies where residual risk remains.« less
  • Marine hydrokinetic (MHK) projects will extract energy from ocean currents and tides, thereby altering water velocities and currents in the site's waterway. These hydrodynamics changes can potentially affect the ecosystem, both near the MHK installation and in surrounding (i.e., far field) regions. In both marine and freshwater environments, devices will remove energy (momentum) from the system, potentially altering water quality and sediment dynamics. In estuaries, tidal ranges and residence times could change (either increasing or decreasing depending on system flow properties and where the effects are being measured). Effects will be proportional to the number and size of structures installed,more » with large MHK projects having the greatest potential effects and requiring the most in-depth analyses. This work implements modification to an existing flow, sediment dynamics, and water-quality code (SNL-EFDC) to qualify, quantify, and visualize the influence of MHK-device momentum/energy extraction at a representative site. New algorithms simulate changes to system fluid dynamics due to removal of momentum and reflect commensurate changes in turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. A generic model is developed to demonstrate corresponding changes to erosion, sediment dynamics, and water quality. Also, bed-slope effects on sediment erosion and bedload velocity are incorporated to better understand scour potential.« less