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Title: Development and Verification of the Soil-Pile Interaction Extension for SubDyn

Abstract

SubDyn is the substructure structural-dynamics module for the aero-hydro-servo-elastic tool FAST v8. SubDyn uses a finite-element model (FEM) to simulate complex multimember lattice structures connected to conventional turbines and towers, and it can make use of the Craig-Bampton model reduction. Here we describe the newly added capability to handle soil-pile stiffness and compare results for monopile and jacket-based offshore wind turbines as obtained with FAST v8, SACS, and EDP (the latter two are modeling software packages commonly used in the offshore oil and gas industry). The level of agreement in terms of modal properties and loads for the entire offshore wind turbine components is excellent, thus allowing SubDyn and FAST v8 to accurately simulate offshore wind turbines on fixed-bottom structures and accounting for the effect of soil dynamics, thus reducing risk to the project.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1416131
Report Number(s):
NREL/PO-5000-70155
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the AWEA Offshore WINDPOWER 2017, 24-25 October 2017, New York City, New York
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; 42 ENGINEERING; SubDyn; wind energy; FAST; soil-pile interaction; wind turbine; offshore; analysis; model verification

Citation Formats

Damiani, Rick R, and Wendt, Fabian F. Development and Verification of the Soil-Pile Interaction Extension for SubDyn. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Damiani, Rick R, & Wendt, Fabian F. Development and Verification of the Soil-Pile Interaction Extension for SubDyn. United States.
Damiani, Rick R, and Wendt, Fabian F. 2018. "Development and Verification of the Soil-Pile Interaction Extension for SubDyn". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1416131.
@article{osti_1416131,
title = {Development and Verification of the Soil-Pile Interaction Extension for SubDyn},
author = {Damiani, Rick R and Wendt, Fabian F},
abstractNote = {SubDyn is the substructure structural-dynamics module for the aero-hydro-servo-elastic tool FAST v8. SubDyn uses a finite-element model (FEM) to simulate complex multimember lattice structures connected to conventional turbines and towers, and it can make use of the Craig-Bampton model reduction. Here we describe the newly added capability to handle soil-pile stiffness and compare results for monopile and jacket-based offshore wind turbines as obtained with FAST v8, SACS, and EDP (the latter two are modeling software packages commonly used in the offshore oil and gas industry). The level of agreement in terms of modal properties and loads for the entire offshore wind turbine components is excellent, thus allowing SubDyn and FAST v8 to accurately simulate offshore wind turbines on fixed-bottom structures and accounting for the effect of soil dynamics, thus reducing risk to the project.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2018,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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  • A mixed culture isolated from ethylbenzene contaminated soil accelerated the biodegradation of ethylbenzene in soil microcosms. This culture, combined with nitrogen and phosphorus nutrient amendments, was used as an inoculum for full-scale on-site bioremediation of ethylbenzene in a soil pile (7,000 cu.ft. volume). Oxygen was supplied to the pile using a vacuum aeration system connected to a piping network within the pile. Air was drawn into the pile at the surface by the vacuum system, with any ethylbenzene contaminated vapors being directed through the piping network to a series of biofilters. The objective of the bioremediation was to reduce ethylbenzenemore » concentrations in the soil from an average of > 400 ppm to < 50 ppm. Efficient ethylbenzene bioremediation was observed in the soil pile in a 15 week period, at which point the average residual contaminant concentration was 32 ppm. Based on a mass balance conducted, 92.4% of the total ethylbenzene was bioremediated in the soil and a further 0.26% was transferred to the vapor phase and remediated in the biofilters.« less
  • f I The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section conducted an independent verification (IV) survey of the clean storage pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project (JAPCSRP) from January 18-25, 1999. The goal of the JAPCSRP is to restore a 24-acre area that was contaminated with plutonium oxide particles during nuclear testing in the 1960s. The selected remedy was a soil sorting operation that combined radiological measurements and mining processes to identify and sequester plutonium-contaminated soil. The soil sorter operated from about 1990 to 1998. The remaining clean soil is stored on-site for planned beneficialmore » use on Johnston Island. The clean storage pile currently consists of approximately 120,000 m3 of coral. ORNL conducted the survey according to a Sampling and Analysis Plan, which proposed to provide an IV of the clean pile by collecting a minimum number (99) of samples. The goal was to ascertain wi th 95% confidence whether 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to the accepted guideline (500-Bq/kg or 13.5-pCi/g) total transuranic (TRU) activity.« less
  • The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section conducted an independent verification (IV) survey of the clean storage pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project (JAPCSRP) from January 18-25, 1999. The goal of the JAPCSRP is to restore a 24-acre area that was contaminated with plutonium oxide particles during nuclear testing in the 1960s. The selected remedy was a soil sorting operation that combined radiological measurements and mining processes to identify and sequester plutonium-contaminated soil. The soil sorter operated from about 1990 to 1998. The remaining clean soil is stored on-site for planned beneficial use onmore » Johnston Island. The clean storage pile currently consists of approximately 120,000 m{sup 3} of coral. ORNL conducted the survey according to a Sampling and Analysis Plan, which proposed to provide an IV of the clean pile by collecting a minimum number (99) of samples. The goal was to ascertain with 95% confidence whether 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to the accepted guideline (500-Bq/kg or 13.5-pCi/g) total transuranic (TRU) activity. In previous IV tasks, ORNL has (1) evaluated and tested the soil sorter system software and hardware and (2) evaluated the quality control (QC) program used at the soil sorter plant. The IV has found that the soil sorter decontamination was effective and significantly reduced plutonium contamination in the soil processed at the JA site. The Field Command Defense Threat Reduction Agency currently plans to re-use soil from the clean pile as a cover to remaining contamination in portions of the radiological control area. Therefore, ORNL was requested to provide an IV. The survey team collected samples from 103 random locations within the top 4 ft of the clean storage pile. The samples were analyzed in the on-site radioanalytical counting laboratory with an American Nuclear Systems (ANS) field instrument used for the detection of low-energy radiation. Nine results exceeded the JA soil screening guideline for distributed contamination of 13.5 pCi/g for total TRUs, ranging from 13.7 to 125.9 pCi/g. Because of these results, the goal of showing with 95% confidence that 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to 13.5 pCi/g-TRU activity cannot be met. The value of 13.5 pCi/g represents the 88th percentile rather than the 95th percentile in a nonparametric one-sided upper 90% confidence limit. Therefore, at the 95% confidence level, 88% of the clean pile is projected to be below the 13.5-pCi/g goal. The Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual recommends use of a nonparametric statistical ''Sign Test'' to demonstrate compliance with release criteria for TRU. Although this survey was not designed to use the sign test, the data herein would demonstrate that the median (50%) of the clean storage pile is below the l3.5-pCi/g derived concentration guideline level. In other words, with the caveat that additional investigation of elevated concentrations was not performed, the data pass the sign test at the 13.5-pCi/g level. Additionally, the lateral extent of the pile was gridded, and 10% of the grid blocks was scanned with field instruments for the detection of low-energy radiation coupled to ratemeter/scalers to screen for the presence of hot particles. No hot particles were detected in the top 1 cm of the grid blocks surveyed.« less