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Title: Structurally Ordered Nanowire Formation from Co-Assembly of DNA Origami and Collagen-Mimetic Peptides

Abstract

In this paper, we describe the co-assembly of two different building units: collagen-mimetic peptides and DNA origami. Two peptides CP ++ and sCP ++ are designed with a sequence comprising a central block (Pro-Hyp-Gly) and two positively charged domains (Pro-Arg-Gly) at both N- and C-termini. Co-assembly of peptides and DNA origami two-layer (TL) nanosheets affords the formation of one-dimensional nanowires with repeating periodicity of similar to 10 nm. Structural analyses suggest a face-to-face stacking of DNA nanosheets with peptides aligned perpendicularly to the sheet surfaces. We demonstrate the potential of selective peptide-DNA association between face-to-face and edge-to-edge packing by tailoring the size of DNA nanostructures. Finally, this study presents an attractive strategy to create hybrid biomolecular assemblies from peptide and DNA-based building blocks that takes advantage of the intrinsic chemical and physical properties of the respective components to encode structural and, potentially, functional complexity within readily accessible biomimetic materials.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). Department of Chemistry
  2. Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States). Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering
  3. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). X-ray Science Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1416014
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 139; Journal Issue: 40; Journal ID: ISSN 0002-7863
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; arrays; design; model; nanosheets; virus

Citation Formats

Jiang, Tao, Meyer, Travis A., Modlin, Charles, Zuo, Xiaobing, Conticello, Vincent P., and Ke, Yonggang. Structurally Ordered Nanowire Formation from Co-Assembly of DNA Origami and Collagen-Mimetic Peptides. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/jacs.7b08087.
Jiang, Tao, Meyer, Travis A., Modlin, Charles, Zuo, Xiaobing, Conticello, Vincent P., & Ke, Yonggang. Structurally Ordered Nanowire Formation from Co-Assembly of DNA Origami and Collagen-Mimetic Peptides. United States. doi:10.1021/jacs.7b08087.
Jiang, Tao, Meyer, Travis A., Modlin, Charles, Zuo, Xiaobing, Conticello, Vincent P., and Ke, Yonggang. Tue . "Structurally Ordered Nanowire Formation from Co-Assembly of DNA Origami and Collagen-Mimetic Peptides". United States. doi:10.1021/jacs.7b08087.
@article{osti_1416014,
title = {Structurally Ordered Nanowire Formation from Co-Assembly of DNA Origami and Collagen-Mimetic Peptides},
author = {Jiang, Tao and Meyer, Travis A. and Modlin, Charles and Zuo, Xiaobing and Conticello, Vincent P. and Ke, Yonggang},
abstractNote = {In this paper, we describe the co-assembly of two different building units: collagen-mimetic peptides and DNA origami. Two peptides CP++ and sCP++ are designed with a sequence comprising a central block (Pro-Hyp-Gly) and two positively charged domains (Pro-Arg-Gly) at both N- and C-termini. Co-assembly of peptides and DNA origami two-layer (TL) nanosheets affords the formation of one-dimensional nanowires with repeating periodicity of similar to 10 nm. Structural analyses suggest a face-to-face stacking of DNA nanosheets with peptides aligned perpendicularly to the sheet surfaces. We demonstrate the potential of selective peptide-DNA association between face-to-face and edge-to-edge packing by tailoring the size of DNA nanostructures. Finally, this study presents an attractive strategy to create hybrid biomolecular assemblies from peptide and DNA-based building blocks that takes advantage of the intrinsic chemical and physical properties of the respective components to encode structural and, potentially, functional complexity within readily accessible biomimetic materials.},
doi = {10.1021/jacs.7b08087},
journal = {Journal of the American Chemical Society},
number = 40,
volume = 139,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Sep 26 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Sep 26 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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