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Title: Enabling a Mobile Workforce: How to Implement Effective Teleworking at U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories - A Guidebook and Toolkit

Abstract

Teleworking, also known as telecommuting, has grown in popularity in today’s workforce, evolving from an employment perk to a business imperative. Facilitated by improved mobile connectivity and ease of remote access, employees and organizations are increasingly embracing teleworking.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [5];  [3];  [6];  [6];  [7]; ORCiD logo [8];  [8]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  2. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)
  3. Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Sustainability Performance Office
  4. CSRA Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)
  5. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
  6. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  7. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  8. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1415922
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2017/257
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS

Citation Formats

Myers, Lissa, Hall, Cheri, Rambo, Christian, Sikes, Karen, Rukavina, Frank, Ischay, Christopher, Stoddard Conrad, Emily, Bender, Sadie, Moran, Mike, Williams, Jeffrey, Nichols, Teresa A., and Ahl, Amanda G. Enabling a Mobile Workforce: How to Implement Effective Teleworking at U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories - A Guidebook and Toolkit. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1415922.
Myers, Lissa, Hall, Cheri, Rambo, Christian, Sikes, Karen, Rukavina, Frank, Ischay, Christopher, Stoddard Conrad, Emily, Bender, Sadie, Moran, Mike, Williams, Jeffrey, Nichols, Teresa A., & Ahl, Amanda G. Enabling a Mobile Workforce: How to Implement Effective Teleworking at U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories - A Guidebook and Toolkit. United States. doi:10.2172/1415922.
Myers, Lissa, Hall, Cheri, Rambo, Christian, Sikes, Karen, Rukavina, Frank, Ischay, Christopher, Stoddard Conrad, Emily, Bender, Sadie, Moran, Mike, Williams, Jeffrey, Nichols, Teresa A., and Ahl, Amanda G. 2017. "Enabling a Mobile Workforce: How to Implement Effective Teleworking at U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories - A Guidebook and Toolkit". United States. doi:10.2172/1415922. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1415922.
@article{osti_1415922,
title = {Enabling a Mobile Workforce: How to Implement Effective Teleworking at U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories - A Guidebook and Toolkit},
author = {Myers, Lissa and Hall, Cheri and Rambo, Christian and Sikes, Karen and Rukavina, Frank and Ischay, Christopher and Stoddard Conrad, Emily and Bender, Sadie and Moran, Mike and Williams, Jeffrey and Nichols, Teresa A. and Ahl, Amanda G.},
abstractNote = {Teleworking, also known as telecommuting, has grown in popularity in today’s workforce, evolving from an employment perk to a business imperative. Facilitated by improved mobile connectivity and ease of remote access, employees and organizations are increasingly embracing teleworking.},
doi = {10.2172/1415922},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:

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