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Title: Underwater Mapping Results for Seabotix vLBV300 Vehicle with Tritech Gemini 720i Imaging Sonar near Newport, OR

Abstract

This document presents results from tests to demonstrate underwater mapping capabilities of an underwater vehicle in conditions typically found in marine renewable energy arrays. These tests were performed with a tethered Seabotix vLBV300 underwater vehicle. The vehicle is equipped with an inertial navigation system (INS) based on a Gladiator Landmark 40 IMU and Teledyne Explorer Doppler Velocity Log, as well as a Gemini 720i scanning sonar acquired from Tritech. The results presented include both indoor pool and offshore deployments. The indoor pool deployments were performed on October 7, 2016 and February 3, 2017 in Corvallis, OR. The offshore deployment was performed on April 20, 2016 off the coast of Newport, OR (44.678 degrees N, 124.109 degrees W). During the mission period, the sea state varied between 3 and 4, with an average significant wave height of 1.6 m. Data was recorded from both the INS and the sonar.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Marine and Hydrokinetic Data Repository (MHKDR); Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1415576
Report Number(s):
221
DOE Contract Number:
EE0006816
Resource Type:
Data
Data Type:
Specialized Mix
Country of Publication:
United States
Availability:
MHKDRHelp@nrel.gov
Language:
English
Subject:
16 Tidal and Wave Power; MHK; Marine; Hydrokinetic; energy; power; ROV; Seabotix; Underwater Vehicle; Newport; Oregon; NETS; Mapping; Sonar; INS; Matlab; C

Citation Formats

Hollinger, Geoffrey. Underwater Mapping Results for Seabotix vLBV300 Vehicle with Tritech Gemini 720i Imaging Sonar near Newport, OR. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.15473/1415576.
Hollinger, Geoffrey. Underwater Mapping Results for Seabotix vLBV300 Vehicle with Tritech Gemini 720i Imaging Sonar near Newport, OR. United States. doi:10.15473/1415576.
Hollinger, Geoffrey. Mon . "Underwater Mapping Results for Seabotix vLBV300 Vehicle with Tritech Gemini 720i Imaging Sonar near Newport, OR". United States. doi:10.15473/1415576. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1415576.
@article{osti_1415576,
title = {Underwater Mapping Results for Seabotix vLBV300 Vehicle with Tritech Gemini 720i Imaging Sonar near Newport, OR},
author = {Hollinger, Geoffrey},
abstractNote = {This document presents results from tests to demonstrate underwater mapping capabilities of an underwater vehicle in conditions typically found in marine renewable energy arrays. These tests were performed with a tethered Seabotix vLBV300 underwater vehicle. The vehicle is equipped with an inertial navigation system (INS) based on a Gladiator Landmark 40 IMU and Teledyne Explorer Doppler Velocity Log, as well as a Gemini 720i scanning sonar acquired from Tritech. The results presented include both indoor pool and offshore deployments. The indoor pool deployments were performed on October 7, 2016 and February 3, 2017 in Corvallis, OR. The offshore deployment was performed on April 20, 2016 off the coast of Newport, OR (44.678 degrees N, 124.109 degrees W). During the mission period, the sea state varied between 3 and 4, with an average significant wave height of 1.6 m. Data was recorded from both the INS and the sonar.},
doi = {10.15473/1415576},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Dataset:

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