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Title: Holography, Gravity and Condensed Matter

Abstract

Over the five years of funding from this grant, I produced 26 publications. These include a book-long monograph on "Holographic Quantum Matter" that is currently in press with MIT press. The remainder were mostly published in Physical Review Letters, the Journal of High Energy Physics, Nature Physics, Classical and Quantum Gravity and Physical Review B. Over this period, the field of holography applied to condensed matter physics developed from a promising theoretical approach to a mature conceptual and practical edifice, whose ideas were realized in experiments. My own work played a central role in this development. In particular, in the final year of this grant, I co-authored two experimental papers in which ideas that I had developed in earlier years were shown to usefully describe transport in strongly correlated materials — these papers were published in Science and in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (obviously my contribution to these papers was theoretical). My theoretical work in this period developed several new directions of research that have proven to be influential. These include (i) The construction of highly inhomogeneous black hole event horizons, realizing disordered fixed points and describing new regimes of classical gravity, (ii) The conjecture ofmore » a bound on diffusivities that could underpin transport in strongly interacting media — an idea which may be proven in the near future and has turned out to be intimately connected to studies of quantum chaos in black holes and strongly correlated media, (iii) The characterization of new forms of hydrodynamic transport, e.g. with phase-disordered order parameters. These studies pertain to key open questions in our understanding of how non-quasiparticle, intrinsically strongly interacting systems can behave. In addition to the interface between holography and strongly interacting condensed matter systems, I made several advances on understanding the role of entanglement in quantum gravity. These included the first computation of holographic entanglement beyond the bulk classical limit as well understanding short distance entanglement in the emergent spacetime of the c=1 matrix quantum mechanics. The objective here is ultimately to understanding how a priori non-local degrees of freedom can re-arrange themselves quantum mechanically to support emergent local dynamics. Much of work funded by this grant involved collaboration with postdocs and graduate students, several of which were directly funded by the grant. These students have now successfully graduated to postdoctoral positions and in one case to high tech industry. The ideas developed in this work have directly fed into my current research in which I am aiming to prove fundamental bounds on entropy production and transport from quantum mechanics and statistical physics. As often, as with much of my previous work, black hole physics can be an inspiration for extreme dynamics such as fundamental bounds, but ultimately one hopes to prove them using more general tools of quantum field theory.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Physics
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Univ., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1415349
Report Number(s):
DOE-HARTNOLL-8169
DOE Contract Number:
SC0008169
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; Holographic Quantum Matter

Citation Formats

Hartnoll, Sean. Holography, Gravity and Condensed Matter. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1415349.
Hartnoll, Sean. Holography, Gravity and Condensed Matter. United States. doi:10.2172/1415349.
Hartnoll, Sean. Wed . "Holography, Gravity and Condensed Matter". United States. doi:10.2172/1415349. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1415349.
@article{osti_1415349,
title = {Holography, Gravity and Condensed Matter},
author = {Hartnoll, Sean},
abstractNote = {Over the five years of funding from this grant, I produced 26 publications. These include a book-long monograph on "Holographic Quantum Matter" that is currently in press with MIT press. The remainder were mostly published in Physical Review Letters, the Journal of High Energy Physics, Nature Physics, Classical and Quantum Gravity and Physical Review B. Over this period, the field of holography applied to condensed matter physics developed from a promising theoretical approach to a mature conceptual and practical edifice, whose ideas were realized in experiments. My own work played a central role in this development. In particular, in the final year of this grant, I co-authored two experimental papers in which ideas that I had developed in earlier years were shown to usefully describe transport in strongly correlated materials — these papers were published in Science and in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (obviously my contribution to these papers was theoretical). My theoretical work in this period developed several new directions of research that have proven to be influential. These include (i) The construction of highly inhomogeneous black hole event horizons, realizing disordered fixed points and describing new regimes of classical gravity, (ii) The conjecture of a bound on diffusivities that could underpin transport in strongly interacting media — an idea which may be proven in the near future and has turned out to be intimately connected to studies of quantum chaos in black holes and strongly correlated media, (iii) The characterization of new forms of hydrodynamic transport, e.g. with phase-disordered order parameters. These studies pertain to key open questions in our understanding of how non-quasiparticle, intrinsically strongly interacting systems can behave. In addition to the interface between holography and strongly interacting condensed matter systems, I made several advances on understanding the role of entanglement in quantum gravity. These included the first computation of holographic entanglement beyond the bulk classical limit as well understanding short distance entanglement in the emergent spacetime of the c=1 matrix quantum mechanics. The objective here is ultimately to understanding how a priori non-local degrees of freedom can re-arrange themselves quantum mechanically to support emergent local dynamics. Much of work funded by this grant involved collaboration with postdocs and graduate students, several of which were directly funded by the grant. These students have now successfully graduated to postdoctoral positions and in one case to high tech industry. The ideas developed in this work have directly fed into my current research in which I am aiming to prove fundamental bounds on entropy production and transport from quantum mechanics and statistical physics. As often, as with much of my previous work, black hole physics can be an inspiration for extreme dynamics such as fundamental bounds, but ultimately one hopes to prove them using more general tools of quantum field theory.},
doi = {10.2172/1415349},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Dec 20 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Dec 20 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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