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Title: Tree cover shows strong sensitivity to precipitation variability across the global tropics

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton New Jersey
  2. Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, Princeton New Jersey, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame Indiana
  3. Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton New Jersey
  4. Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana Illinois
  5. Department of Biological & Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon
  6. Department of Ocean Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station Texas, Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station Texas, Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station Texas
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1415296
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0014363
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Global Ecology and Biogeography
Additional Journal Information:
Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-01-02 02:09:09; Journal ID: ISSN 1466-822X
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
Country unknown/Code not available
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Xu, Xiangtao, Medvigy, David, Trugman, Anna T., Guan, Kaiyu, Good, Stephen P., and Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio. Tree cover shows strong sensitivity to precipitation variability across the global tropics. Country unknown/Code not available: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1111/geb.12707.
Xu, Xiangtao, Medvigy, David, Trugman, Anna T., Guan, Kaiyu, Good, Stephen P., & Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio. Tree cover shows strong sensitivity to precipitation variability across the global tropics. Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1111/geb.12707.
Xu, Xiangtao, Medvigy, David, Trugman, Anna T., Guan, Kaiyu, Good, Stephen P., and Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio. 2018. "Tree cover shows strong sensitivity to precipitation variability across the global tropics". Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1111/geb.12707.
@article{osti_1415296,
title = {Tree cover shows strong sensitivity to precipitation variability across the global tropics},
author = {Xu, Xiangtao and Medvigy, David and Trugman, Anna T. and Guan, Kaiyu and Good, Stephen P. and Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/geb.12707},
journal = {Global Ecology and Biogeography},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {Country unknown/Code not available},
year = 2018,
month = 1
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on January 2, 2019
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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