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Title: Thermodynamic modeling and uncertainty quantification of CO 2 -loaded aqueous MEA solutions

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1415248
Grant/Contract Number:
7210843
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Chemical Engineering Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 168; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-12-30 08:32:24; Journal ID: ISSN 0009-2509
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Morgan, Joshua C., Chinen, Anderson Soares, Omell, Benjamin, Bhattacharyya, Debangsu, Tong, Charles, and Miller, David C. Thermodynamic modeling and uncertainty quantification of CO 2 -loaded aqueous MEA solutions. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ces.2017.04.049.
Morgan, Joshua C., Chinen, Anderson Soares, Omell, Benjamin, Bhattacharyya, Debangsu, Tong, Charles, & Miller, David C. Thermodynamic modeling and uncertainty quantification of CO 2 -loaded aqueous MEA solutions. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.ces.2017.04.049.
Morgan, Joshua C., Chinen, Anderson Soares, Omell, Benjamin, Bhattacharyya, Debangsu, Tong, Charles, and Miller, David C. 2017. "Thermodynamic modeling and uncertainty quantification of CO 2 -loaded aqueous MEA solutions". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.ces.2017.04.049.
@article{osti_1415248,
title = {Thermodynamic modeling and uncertainty quantification of CO 2 -loaded aqueous MEA solutions},
author = {Morgan, Joshua C. and Chinen, Anderson Soares and Omell, Benjamin and Bhattacharyya, Debangsu and Tong, Charles and Miller, David C.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.ces.2017.04.049},
journal = {Chemical Engineering Science},
number = C,
volume = 168,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on May 11, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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