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Title: Colonization Habitat Controls Biomass, Composition, and Metabolic Activity of Attached Microbial Communities in the Columbia River Hyporheic Corridor

Abstract

Hydrologic exchange plays a critical role in biogeochemical cycling within the hyporheic zone (the interface between river water and groundwater) of riverine ecosystems. Such exchange may set limits on the rates of microbial metabolism and impose deterministic selection on microbial communities that adapt to dynamically changing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) sources. This study examined the response of attached microbial communities (in situcolonized sand packs) from groundwater, hyporheic, and riverbed habitats within the Columbia River hyporheic corridor to “cross-feeding” with either groundwater, river water, or DOC-free artificial fluids. Our working hypothesis was that deterministic selection duringin situcolonization would dictate the response to cross-feeding, with communities displaying maximal biomass and respiration when supplied with their native fluid source. In contrast to expectations, the major observation was that the riverbed colonized sand had much higher biomass and respiratory activity, as well as a distinct community structure, compared with those of the hyporheic and groundwater colonized sands. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing revealed a much higher proportion of certain heterotrophic taxa as well as significant numbers of eukaryotic algal chloroplasts in the riverbed colonized sand. Significant quantities of DOC were released from riverbed sediment and colonized sand, and separate experiments showed that the releasedmore » DOC stimulated respiration in the groundwater and piezometer colonized sand. These results suggest that the accumulation and degradation of labile particulate organic carbon (POC) within the riverbed are likely to release DOC, which may enter the hyporheic corridor during hydrologic exchange, thereby stimulating microbial activity and imposing deterministic selective pressure on the microbial community composition. IMPORTANCEThe influence of river water-groundwater mixing on hyporheic zone microbial community structure and function is an important but poorly understood component of riverine biogeochemistry. This study employed an experimental approach to gain insight into how such mixing might be expected to influence the biomass, respiration, and composition of hyporheic zone microbial communities. Colonized sands from three different habitats (groundwater, river water, and hyporheic) were “cross-fed” with either groundwater, river water, or DOC-free artificial fluids. We expected that the colonization history would dictate the response to cross-feeding, with communities displaying maximal biomass and respiration when supplied with their native fluid source. By contrast, the major observation was that the riverbed communities had much higher biomass and respiration, as well as a distinct community structure compared with those of the hyporheic and groundwater colonized sands. These results highlight the importance of riverbed microbial metabolism in organic carbon processing in hyporheic corridors.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ORCiD logo; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1415091
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-129379
Journal ID: ISSN 0099-2240; 49160; KP1702030
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied and Environmental Microbiology; Journal Volume: 83; Journal Issue: 16
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Stern, Noah, Ginder-Vogel, Matthew, Stegen, James C., Arntzen, Evan, Kennedy, David W., Larget, Bret R., Roden, Eric E., and Kostka, Joel E.. Colonization Habitat Controls Biomass, Composition, and Metabolic Activity of Attached Microbial Communities in the Columbia River Hyporheic Corridor. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1128/AEM.00260-17.
Stern, Noah, Ginder-Vogel, Matthew, Stegen, James C., Arntzen, Evan, Kennedy, David W., Larget, Bret R., Roden, Eric E., & Kostka, Joel E.. Colonization Habitat Controls Biomass, Composition, and Metabolic Activity of Attached Microbial Communities in the Columbia River Hyporheic Corridor. United States. doi:10.1128/AEM.00260-17.
Stern, Noah, Ginder-Vogel, Matthew, Stegen, James C., Arntzen, Evan, Kennedy, David W., Larget, Bret R., Roden, Eric E., and Kostka, Joel E.. Fri . "Colonization Habitat Controls Biomass, Composition, and Metabolic Activity of Attached Microbial Communities in the Columbia River Hyporheic Corridor". United States. doi:10.1128/AEM.00260-17.
@article{osti_1415091,
title = {Colonization Habitat Controls Biomass, Composition, and Metabolic Activity of Attached Microbial Communities in the Columbia River Hyporheic Corridor},
author = {Stern, Noah and Ginder-Vogel, Matthew and Stegen, James C. and Arntzen, Evan and Kennedy, David W. and Larget, Bret R. and Roden, Eric E. and Kostka, Joel E.},
abstractNote = {Hydrologic exchange plays a critical role in biogeochemical cycling within the hyporheic zone (the interface between river water and groundwater) of riverine ecosystems. Such exchange may set limits on the rates of microbial metabolism and impose deterministic selection on microbial communities that adapt to dynamically changing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) sources. This study examined the response of attached microbial communities (in situcolonized sand packs) from groundwater, hyporheic, and riverbed habitats within the Columbia River hyporheic corridor to “cross-feeding” with either groundwater, river water, or DOC-free artificial fluids. Our working hypothesis was that deterministic selection duringin situcolonization would dictate the response to cross-feeding, with communities displaying maximal biomass and respiration when supplied with their native fluid source. In contrast to expectations, the major observation was that the riverbed colonized sand had much higher biomass and respiratory activity, as well as a distinct community structure, compared with those of the hyporheic and groundwater colonized sands. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing revealed a much higher proportion of certain heterotrophic taxa as well as significant numbers of eukaryotic algal chloroplasts in the riverbed colonized sand. Significant quantities of DOC were released from riverbed sediment and colonized sand, and separate experiments showed that the released DOC stimulated respiration in the groundwater and piezometer colonized sand. These results suggest that the accumulation and degradation of labile particulate organic carbon (POC) within the riverbed are likely to release DOC, which may enter the hyporheic corridor during hydrologic exchange, thereby stimulating microbial activity and imposing deterministic selective pressure on the microbial community composition. IMPORTANCEThe influence of river water-groundwater mixing on hyporheic zone microbial community structure and function is an important but poorly understood component of riverine biogeochemistry. This study employed an experimental approach to gain insight into how such mixing might be expected to influence the biomass, respiration, and composition of hyporheic zone microbial communities. Colonized sands from three different habitats (groundwater, river water, and hyporheic) were “cross-fed” with either groundwater, river water, or DOC-free artificial fluids. We expected that the colonization history would dictate the response to cross-feeding, with communities displaying maximal biomass and respiration when supplied with their native fluid source. By contrast, the major observation was that the riverbed communities had much higher biomass and respiration, as well as a distinct community structure compared with those of the hyporheic and groundwater colonized sands. These results highlight the importance of riverbed microbial metabolism in organic carbon processing in hyporheic corridors.},
doi = {10.1128/AEM.00260-17},
journal = {Applied and Environmental Microbiology},
number = 16,
volume = 83,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 09 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Jun 09 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}