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Title: Final Project Report CFA-14-6357: A New Paradigm for Understanding Multiphase Ceramic Waste Form Performance

Abstract

This project fabricated model multiphase ceramic waste forms with processing-controlled microstructures followed by advanced characterization with synchrotron and electron microscopy-based 3D tomography to provide elemental and chemical state-specific information resulting in compositional phase maps of ceramic composites. Details of 3D microstructural features were incorporated into computer-based simulations using durability data for individual constituent phases as inputs in order to predict the performance of multiphase waste forms with varying microstructure and phase connectivity.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Clemson Univ., SC (United States)
  2. Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)
  3. Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)
  4. Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Clemson Univ., SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Fuel Cycle Technologies (NE-5)
OSTI Identifier:
1415025
Report Number(s):
14-6357 DOE-Clemson-08260
14-6357
DOE Contract Number:
NE0008260
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; waste form; ceramics; 3D imaging

Citation Formats

Brinkman, Kyle, Bordia, Rajendra, Reifsnider, Kenneth, Chiu, Wilson, and Amoroso, Jake. Final Project Report CFA-14-6357: A New Paradigm for Understanding Multiphase Ceramic Waste Form Performance. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1415025.
Brinkman, Kyle, Bordia, Rajendra, Reifsnider, Kenneth, Chiu, Wilson, & Amoroso, Jake. Final Project Report CFA-14-6357: A New Paradigm for Understanding Multiphase Ceramic Waste Form Performance. United States. doi:10.2172/1415025.
Brinkman, Kyle, Bordia, Rajendra, Reifsnider, Kenneth, Chiu, Wilson, and Amoroso, Jake. 2017. "Final Project Report CFA-14-6357: A New Paradigm for Understanding Multiphase Ceramic Waste Form Performance". United States. doi:10.2172/1415025. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1415025.
@article{osti_1415025,
title = {Final Project Report CFA-14-6357: A New Paradigm for Understanding Multiphase Ceramic Waste Form Performance},
author = {Brinkman, Kyle and Bordia, Rajendra and Reifsnider, Kenneth and Chiu, Wilson and Amoroso, Jake},
abstractNote = {This project fabricated model multiphase ceramic waste forms with processing-controlled microstructures followed by advanced characterization with synchrotron and electron microscopy-based 3D tomography to provide elemental and chemical state-specific information resulting in compositional phase maps of ceramic composites. Details of 3D microstructural features were incorporated into computer-based simulations using durability data for individual constituent phases as inputs in order to predict the performance of multiphase waste forms with varying microstructure and phase connectivity.},
doi = {10.2172/1415025},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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  • FY16 efforts were focused on direct comparison of multi-phase ceramic waste forms produced via melt processing and HIP methods. Based on promising waste form compositions previously devised at SRNL, simulant material was prepared at SRNL and a portion was sent to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) for HIP treatments, while the remainder of the material was melt processed at SRNL. The microstructure, phase formation, elemental speciation, and leach behavior, and radiation stability of the fabricated ceramics was performed. In addition, melt-processed ceramics designed with different fractions of hollandite, zirconolite, perovskite, and pyrochlore phases were investigated. for performancemore » and properties.« less
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