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Title: Final Project Report CFA-14-6357: A New Paradigm for Understanding Multiphase Ceramic Waste Form Performance

Abstract

This project fabricated model multiphase ceramic waste forms with processing-controlled microstructures followed by advanced characterization with synchrotron and electron microscopy-based 3D tomography to provide elemental and chemical state-specific information resulting in compositional phase maps of ceramic composites. Details of 3D microstructural features were incorporated into computer-based simulations using durability data for individual constituent phases as inputs in order to predict the performance of multiphase waste forms with varying microstructure and phase connectivity.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Clemson Univ., SC (United States)
  2. Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)
  3. Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)
  4. Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Clemson Univ., SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Fuel Cycle Technologies (NE-5)
OSTI Identifier:
1415025
Report Number(s):
14-6357 DOE-Clemson-08260
14-6357
DOE Contract Number:
NE0008260
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; waste form; ceramics; 3D imaging

Citation Formats

Brinkman, Kyle, Bordia, Rajendra, Reifsnider, Kenneth, Chiu, Wilson, and Amoroso, Jake. Final Project Report CFA-14-6357: A New Paradigm for Understanding Multiphase Ceramic Waste Form Performance. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1415025.
Brinkman, Kyle, Bordia, Rajendra, Reifsnider, Kenneth, Chiu, Wilson, & Amoroso, Jake. Final Project Report CFA-14-6357: A New Paradigm for Understanding Multiphase Ceramic Waste Form Performance. United States. doi:10.2172/1415025.
Brinkman, Kyle, Bordia, Rajendra, Reifsnider, Kenneth, Chiu, Wilson, and Amoroso, Jake. Thu . "Final Project Report CFA-14-6357: A New Paradigm for Understanding Multiphase Ceramic Waste Form Performance". United States. doi:10.2172/1415025. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1415025.
@article{osti_1415025,
title = {Final Project Report CFA-14-6357: A New Paradigm for Understanding Multiphase Ceramic Waste Form Performance},
author = {Brinkman, Kyle and Bordia, Rajendra and Reifsnider, Kenneth and Chiu, Wilson and Amoroso, Jake},
abstractNote = {This project fabricated model multiphase ceramic waste forms with processing-controlled microstructures followed by advanced characterization with synchrotron and electron microscopy-based 3D tomography to provide elemental and chemical state-specific information resulting in compositional phase maps of ceramic composites. Details of 3D microstructural features were incorporated into computer-based simulations using durability data for individual constituent phases as inputs in order to predict the performance of multiphase waste forms with varying microstructure and phase connectivity.},
doi = {10.2172/1415025},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 28 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Dec 28 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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