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Title: The kinetics of pre-mRNA splicing in the Drosophila genome and the influence of gene architecture

Abstract

Production of most eukaryotic mRNAs requires splicing of introns from pre-mRNA. The splicing reaction requires definition of splice sites, which are initially recognized in either intron-spanning (‘intron definition’) or exon-spanning (‘exon definition’) pairs. To understand how exon and intron length and splice site recognition mode impact splicing, we measured splicing rates genome-wide in Drosophila, using metabolic labeling/RNA sequencing and new mathematical models to estimate rates. We found that the modal intron length range of 60–70 nt represents a local maximum of splicing rates, but that much longer exon-defined introns are spliced even faster and more accurately. We observed unexpectedly low variation in splicing rates across introns in the same gene, suggesting the presence of gene-level influences, and we identified multiple gene level variables associated with splicing rate. Together our data suggest that developmental and stress response genes may have preferentially evolved exon definition in order to enhance the rate or accuracy of splicing.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [5]
  1. Departments of Biology and Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, United States
  2. Epigenetics and Stem Cell Biology Laboratory, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle, United States, Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States
  3. Program in Computational and Systems Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, United States
  4. Center for Integrative Bioinformatics, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle, United States
  5. Departments of Biology and Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, United States, Program in Computational and Systems Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, United States
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1414969
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1414970
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-97ER25308
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
eLife
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-01-09 08:01:54; Journal ID: ISSN 2050-084X
Publisher:
eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Pai, Athma A., Henriques, Telmo, McCue, Kayla, Burkholder, Adam, Adelman, Karen, and Burge, Christopher B.. The kinetics of pre-mRNA splicing in the Drosophila genome and the influence of gene architecture. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.7554/eLife.32537.
Pai, Athma A., Henriques, Telmo, McCue, Kayla, Burkholder, Adam, Adelman, Karen, & Burge, Christopher B.. The kinetics of pre-mRNA splicing in the Drosophila genome and the influence of gene architecture. United States. doi:10.7554/eLife.32537.
Pai, Athma A., Henriques, Telmo, McCue, Kayla, Burkholder, Adam, Adelman, Karen, and Burge, Christopher B.. Wed . "The kinetics of pre-mRNA splicing in the Drosophila genome and the influence of gene architecture". United States. doi:10.7554/eLife.32537.
@article{osti_1414969,
title = {The kinetics of pre-mRNA splicing in the Drosophila genome and the influence of gene architecture},
author = {Pai, Athma A. and Henriques, Telmo and McCue, Kayla and Burkholder, Adam and Adelman, Karen and Burge, Christopher B.},
abstractNote = {Production of most eukaryotic mRNAs requires splicing of introns from pre-mRNA. The splicing reaction requires definition of splice sites, which are initially recognized in either intron-spanning (‘intron definition’) or exon-spanning (‘exon definition’) pairs. To understand how exon and intron length and splice site recognition mode impact splicing, we measured splicing rates genome-wide in Drosophila, using metabolic labeling/RNA sequencing and new mathematical models to estimate rates. We found that the modal intron length range of 60–70 nt represents a local maximum of splicing rates, but that much longer exon-defined introns are spliced even faster and more accurately. We observed unexpectedly low variation in splicing rates across introns in the same gene, suggesting the presence of gene-level influences, and we identified multiple gene level variables associated with splicing rate. Together our data suggest that developmental and stress response genes may have preferentially evolved exon definition in order to enhance the rate or accuracy of splicing.},
doi = {10.7554/eLife.32537},
journal = {eLife},
number = ,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Dec 27 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Dec 27 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.7554/eLife.32537

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