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Title: MODELING ACTINIDE SOLUBILITIES IN ALKALINE TO HYPERALKALINE SOLUTIONS: SOLBILITY OF AM(OH)3(S) IN KOH SOLUTIONS.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environmental Management (EM)
OSTI Identifier:
1414892
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-10095B
657133
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Xiong, Yongliang. MODELING ACTINIDE SOLUBILITIES IN ALKALINE TO HYPERALKALINE SOLUTIONS: SOLBILITY OF AM(OH)3(S) IN KOH SOLUTIONS.. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Xiong, Yongliang. MODELING ACTINIDE SOLUBILITIES IN ALKALINE TO HYPERALKALINE SOLUTIONS: SOLBILITY OF AM(OH)3(S) IN KOH SOLUTIONS.. United States.
Xiong, Yongliang. 2017. "MODELING ACTINIDE SOLUBILITIES IN ALKALINE TO HYPERALKALINE SOLUTIONS: SOLBILITY OF AM(OH)3(S) IN KOH SOLUTIONS.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1414892,
title = {MODELING ACTINIDE SOLUBILITIES IN ALKALINE TO HYPERALKALINE SOLUTIONS: SOLBILITY OF AM(OH)3(S) IN KOH SOLUTIONS.},
author = {Xiong, Yongliang},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

Book:
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