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Title: Removal of dissolved silica from industrial waters using inorganic ion exchangers

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1414889
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Water Process Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-12-26 19:45:56; Journal ID: ISSN 2214-7144
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Sasan, Koroush, Brady, Patrick V., Krumhansl, James L., and Nenoff, Tina M. Removal of dissolved silica from industrial waters using inorganic ion exchangers. Netherlands: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jwpe.2017.02.006.
Sasan, Koroush, Brady, Patrick V., Krumhansl, James L., & Nenoff, Tina M. Removal of dissolved silica from industrial waters using inorganic ion exchangers. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.jwpe.2017.02.006.
Sasan, Koroush, Brady, Patrick V., Krumhansl, James L., and Nenoff, Tina M. 2017. "Removal of dissolved silica from industrial waters using inorganic ion exchangers". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.jwpe.2017.02.006.
@article{osti_1414889,
title = {Removal of dissolved silica from industrial waters using inorganic ion exchangers},
author = {Sasan, Koroush and Brady, Patrick V. and Krumhansl, James L. and Nenoff, Tina M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jwpe.2017.02.006},
journal = {Journal of Water Process Engineering},
number = C,
volume = 17,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on April 4, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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  • The removal of silica, ubiquitous in produced and industrial waters, by novel mixed oxides is investigated in this present study. We have combined the advantage of high selectivity hydrotalcite (HTC, (Mg 6Al 2(OH) 16(CO 3)¬∑4H 2O)), with large surface area of active alumina (AA, (Al 2O 3)) for effective removing of the dissolved silica from cooling tower water. The batch test results indicated the combined HTC/AA is a more effective method for removing silica from CTW than using each of HTC or AA separately. The silica uptake was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Ourmore » results indicate HTC/AA effectively removes silica from cooling tower water (CTW), even in the presence of large concentrations of competing anions, such as Cl -, NO 3 - HCO 3 -, CO 3 2- and SO 4 2-. The Single Path Flow Through (SPFT) tests confirmed to rapid uptake of silica by combined HTC/AA during column filtration. The experimental data of silica adsorption fit best to Freundlich isotherm model.« less
  • The chemical and microbial activity of corroding iron metal is examined in the acid rock drainage (ARD) resulting from pyrite oxidation to determine the effectiveness in neutralizing the ARD and reducing the load of dissolved heavy metals. ARD from Berkeley Pit, MT, is treated with iron in batch reactors and columns containing iron granules. Iron, in acidic solution, hydrolyzes water producing hydride and hydroxide ion resulting in a concomitant increase in pH and decrease in redox potential. The dissolved metals in ARD are removed by several mechanisms. Copper and cadmium cement onto the surface of the iron as zerovalent metals.more » Hydroxide forming metals such as aluminum, zinc, and nickel form complexes with iron and other metals precipitating from solution as the pH rises. Metalloids such as arsenic and antimony coprecipitate with iron. As metals precipitate from solution, various other mechanisms including coprecipitation, sorption, and ion exchange also enhance removal of metals from solution. Corroding iron also creates a reducing environment supportive for sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) growth. Increases in SRB populations of 5,000-fold are observed in iron metal treated ARD solutions. Although the biological process is slow, sulfidogenesis is an additional pathway to further stabilize heavy metal precipitates.« less