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Title: Rapid multiphase-field model development using a modular free energy based approach with automatic differentiation in MOOSE/MARMOT

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1414841
Grant/Contract Number:
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Computational Materials Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 132; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-12-26 02:37:38; Journal ID: ISSN 0927-0256
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Schwen, D., Aagesen, L. K., Peterson, J. W., and Tonks, M. R. Rapid multiphase-field model development using a modular free energy based approach with automatic differentiation in MOOSE/MARMOT. Netherlands: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.commatsci.2017.02.017.
Schwen, D., Aagesen, L. K., Peterson, J. W., & Tonks, M. R. Rapid multiphase-field model development using a modular free energy based approach with automatic differentiation in MOOSE/MARMOT. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.commatsci.2017.02.017.
Schwen, D., Aagesen, L. K., Peterson, J. W., and Tonks, M. R. Mon . "Rapid multiphase-field model development using a modular free energy based approach with automatic differentiation in MOOSE/MARMOT". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.commatsci.2017.02.017.
@article{osti_1414841,
title = {Rapid multiphase-field model development using a modular free energy based approach with automatic differentiation in MOOSE/MARMOT},
author = {Schwen, D. and Aagesen, L. K. and Peterson, J. W. and Tonks, M. R.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.commatsci.2017.02.017},
journal = {Computational Materials Science},
number = C,
volume = 132,
place = {Netherlands},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.commatsci.2017.02.017

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 4works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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