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Title: Updated (BP3) Technical and Economic Feasibility Study - Electrochemical Membrane for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Generation

Abstract

This topical report summarizes the results of an updated Technical & Economic Feasibility Study (T&EFS) which was conducted in Budget Period 3 of the project to evaluate the performance and cost of the Electrochemical Membrane (ECM)-based CO 2 capture system. The ECM technology is derived from commercially available inorganic membranes; the same used in FuelCell Energy’s commercial fuel cell power plants and sold under the trade name Direct FuelCell® (DFC®). The ECM stacks are utilized in the Combined Electric Power (generation) And Carbon dioxide Separation (CEPACS) systems which can be deployed as add-ons to conventional power plants (Pulverized Coal, Combined Cycle, etc.) or industrial facilities to simultaneously produce power while capturing >90% of the CO 2 from the flue gas. In this study, an ECM-based CEPACS plant was designed to capture and compress >90% of the CO 2 (for sequestration or beneficial use) from the flue gas of a reference 550 MW (nominal, net AC) Pulverized Coal (PC) Rankine Cycle (Subcritical steam) power plant. ECM performance was updated based on bench scale ECM stack test results. The system process simulations were performed to generate the CEPACS plant performance estimates. The performance assessment included estimation of the parasitic power consumption formore » CO 2 capture and compression, and the efficiency impact on the PC plant. While the ECM-based CEPACS system for the 550 MW PC plant captures 90% of CO 2 from the flue gas, it generates additional (net AC) power after compensating for the auxiliary power requirements of CO 2 capture and compression. An equipment list, ECM stacks packaging design, and CEPACS plant layout were developed to facilitate the economic analysis. Vendor quotes were also solicited. The economic feasibility study included estimation of CEPACS plant capital cost, cost of electricity (COE) analyses and estimation of cost per ton of CO 2 captured. The incremental COE for the ECM-based CO 2 capture is expected to meet U.S. DOE’s target of 35%. This study has indicated that CEPACS systems offer significant benefits with respect to cost, performance, water consumption and emissions to environment. The realization of these benefits will provide a single solution to carbon dioxide capture in addition to meeting the increasing demand for electricity.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. FuelCell Energy, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
FuelCell Energy, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1414832
Report Number(s):
DOE-FCE-0007634-1
DOE Contract Number:  
FE0007634
Resource Type:
Other
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; Electrochemical; Membrane; Carbon; CO2; Carbon Dioxide; Capture; Fuel Cell; Coal; Power; MCFC; Carbonate; Molten; Direct FuelCell; DFC

Citation Formats

Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein. Updated (BP3) Technical and Economic Feasibility Study - Electrochemical Membrane for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Generation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein. Updated (BP3) Technical and Economic Feasibility Study - Electrochemical Membrane for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Generation. United States.
Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein. Thu . "Updated (BP3) Technical and Economic Feasibility Study - Electrochemical Membrane for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Generation". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1414832.
@article{osti_1414832,
title = {Updated (BP3) Technical and Economic Feasibility Study - Electrochemical Membrane for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Generation},
author = {Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein},
abstractNote = {This topical report summarizes the results of an updated Technical & Economic Feasibility Study (T&EFS) which was conducted in Budget Period 3 of the project to evaluate the performance and cost of the Electrochemical Membrane (ECM)-based CO2 capture system. The ECM technology is derived from commercially available inorganic membranes; the same used in FuelCell Energy’s commercial fuel cell power plants and sold under the trade name Direct FuelCell® (DFC®). The ECM stacks are utilized in the Combined Electric Power (generation) And Carbon dioxide Separation (CEPACS) systems which can be deployed as add-ons to conventional power plants (Pulverized Coal, Combined Cycle, etc.) or industrial facilities to simultaneously produce power while capturing >90% of the CO2 from the flue gas. In this study, an ECM-based CEPACS plant was designed to capture and compress >90% of the CO2 (for sequestration or beneficial use) from the flue gas of a reference 550 MW (nominal, net AC) Pulverized Coal (PC) Rankine Cycle (Subcritical steam) power plant. ECM performance was updated based on bench scale ECM stack test results. The system process simulations were performed to generate the CEPACS plant performance estimates. The performance assessment included estimation of the parasitic power consumption for CO2 capture and compression, and the efficiency impact on the PC plant. While the ECM-based CEPACS system for the 550 MW PC plant captures 90% of CO2 from the flue gas, it generates additional (net AC) power after compensating for the auxiliary power requirements of CO2 capture and compression. An equipment list, ECM stacks packaging design, and CEPACS plant layout were developed to facilitate the economic analysis. Vendor quotes were also solicited. The economic feasibility study included estimation of CEPACS plant capital cost, cost of electricity (COE) analyses and estimation of cost per ton of CO2 captured. The incremental COE for the ECM-based CO2 capture is expected to meet U.S. DOE’s target of 35%. This study has indicated that CEPACS systems offer significant benefits with respect to cost, performance, water consumption and emissions to environment. The realization of these benefits will provide a single solution to carbon dioxide capture in addition to meeting the increasing demand for electricity.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}