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Title: Three-dimensional Imaging for Large LArTPCs

Abstract

High-performance event reconstruction is critical for current and future massive liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) to realize their full scientic potential. LArTPCs with readout using wire planes provides a limited number of 2D projections. In general, without a pixel-type readout it is challenging to achieve unambiguous 3D event reconstruction. As a remedy, we present a novel 3D imaging method, Wire-Cell, which incorporates the charge and sparsity information in addition to the time and geometry through simple and robust mathematics.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1414824
Report Number(s):
BNL-114851-2017-IR
R&D Project: PO-022; KA2201020
DOE Contract Number:
SC0012704
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; reconstruction; dimensional; imaging

Citation Formats

Chao, C., Qian, X., Viren, B., and Diwan, M. Three-dimensional Imaging for Large LArTPCs. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1414824.
Chao, C., Qian, X., Viren, B., & Diwan, M. Three-dimensional Imaging for Large LArTPCs. United States. doi:10.2172/1414824.
Chao, C., Qian, X., Viren, B., and Diwan, M. 2017. "Three-dimensional Imaging for Large LArTPCs". United States. doi:10.2172/1414824. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1414824.
@article{osti_1414824,
title = {Three-dimensional Imaging for Large LArTPCs},
author = {Chao, C. and Qian, X. and Viren, B. and Diwan, M.},
abstractNote = {High-performance event reconstruction is critical for current and future massive liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) to realize their full scientic potential. LArTPCs with readout using wire planes provides a limited number of 2D projections. In general, without a pixel-type readout it is challenging to achieve unambiguous 3D event reconstruction. As a remedy, we present a novel 3D imaging method, Wire-Cell, which incorporates the charge and sparsity information in addition to the time and geometry through simple and robust mathematics.},
doi = {10.2172/1414824},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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