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Title: Challenges and Opportunities of Grid Modernization and Electric Transportation

Abstract

Grid investments that support electric vehicle deployments as a part of planned modernization efforts can enable a more efficient and cost-effective transition to electric transportation and allow investor-owned electric companies and public power companies to realize new revenue resources in times of flat or declining loads. This paper discusses the challenges and opportunities associated with an increase in plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) adoption and how working together both sectors stand to benefit from closer integration.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States)
  2. Allegheny Science and Technology, Bridgeport, WV (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
U.S. Department of Energy and Allegheny Science & Technology
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V) (Vehicle Technologies Office Corporate)
OSTI Identifier:
1414811
Report Number(s):
DOE/EE-1473
7806
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; grid modernization

Citation Formats

Graham, Robert L., Francis, Julieta, and Bogacz, Richard J.. Challenges and Opportunities of Grid Modernization and Electric Transportation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1414811.
Graham, Robert L., Francis, Julieta, & Bogacz, Richard J.. Challenges and Opportunities of Grid Modernization and Electric Transportation. United States. doi:10.2172/1414811.
Graham, Robert L., Francis, Julieta, and Bogacz, Richard J.. Fri . "Challenges and Opportunities of Grid Modernization and Electric Transportation". United States. doi:10.2172/1414811. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1414811.
@article{osti_1414811,
title = {Challenges and Opportunities of Grid Modernization and Electric Transportation},
author = {Graham, Robert L. and Francis, Julieta and Bogacz, Richard J.},
abstractNote = {Grid investments that support electric vehicle deployments as a part of planned modernization efforts can enable a more efficient and cost-effective transition to electric transportation and allow investor-owned electric companies and public power companies to realize new revenue resources in times of flat or declining loads. This paper discusses the challenges and opportunities associated with an increase in plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) adoption and how working together both sectors stand to benefit from closer integration.},
doi = {10.2172/1414811},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 31 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Mar 31 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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