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Title: Correspondence: Reply to ‘Phantom phonon localization in relaxors’

Abstract

The Correspondence by Gehring et al. mistakes Anderson phonon localization for the concept of an atomic-scale local mode. An atomic-scale local mode refers to a single atom vibrating on its own within a crystal. Such a local mode will have an almost flat intensity profile, but this is not the same as phonon localization. Anderson localization is a wave interference effect in a disordered system that results in waves becoming spatially localized. The length scale of the localized waves is set by the wavelength, which is approximately 2 nm in this case. This larger length scale in real space means narrower intensity profiles in reciprocal space. Here, we conclude that the claims in the Correspondence by Gehring et al. are incorrect because they mistakenly assume that the length scale for Anderson localization is atomic, and because the experimental observations rule out multiple scattering as the origin.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science & Technology Division
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Quantum Condensed Matter Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1414696
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Manley, Michael E., Abernathy, Douglas L., and Budai, John D. Correspondence: Reply to ‘Phantom phonon localization in relaxors’. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01396-5.
Manley, Michael E., Abernathy, Douglas L., & Budai, John D. Correspondence: Reply to ‘Phantom phonon localization in relaxors’. United States. doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01396-5.
Manley, Michael E., Abernathy, Douglas L., and Budai, John D. Tue . "Correspondence: Reply to ‘Phantom phonon localization in relaxors’". United States. doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01396-5. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1414696.
@article{osti_1414696,
title = {Correspondence: Reply to ‘Phantom phonon localization in relaxors’},
author = {Manley, Michael E. and Abernathy, Douglas L. and Budai, John D.},
abstractNote = {The Correspondence by Gehring et al. mistakes Anderson phonon localization for the concept of an atomic-scale local mode. An atomic-scale local mode refers to a single atom vibrating on its own within a crystal. Such a local mode will have an almost flat intensity profile, but this is not the same as phonon localization. Anderson localization is a wave interference effect in a disordered system that results in waves becoming spatially localized. The length scale of the localized waves is set by the wavelength, which is approximately 2 nm in this case. This larger length scale in real space means narrower intensity profiles in reciprocal space. Here, we conclude that the claims in the Correspondence by Gehring et al. are incorrect because they mistakenly assume that the length scale for Anderson localization is atomic, and because the experimental observations rule out multiple scattering as the origin.},
doi = {10.1038/s41467-017-01396-5},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = 1,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Dec 05 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Dec 05 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 1 work
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