skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: A framework for quantifying the impact of occupant behavior on energy savings of energy conservation measures

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1414600
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Energy and Buildings
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 146; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-12-22 02:32:22; Journal ID: ISSN 0378-7788
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Sun, Kaiyu, and Hong, Tianzhen. A framework for quantifying the impact of occupant behavior on energy savings of energy conservation measures. Netherlands: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2017.04.065.
Sun, Kaiyu, & Hong, Tianzhen. A framework for quantifying the impact of occupant behavior on energy savings of energy conservation measures. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2017.04.065.
Sun, Kaiyu, and Hong, Tianzhen. 2017. "A framework for quantifying the impact of occupant behavior on energy savings of energy conservation measures". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2017.04.065.
@article{osti_1414600,
title = {A framework for quantifying the impact of occupant behavior on energy savings of energy conservation measures},
author = {Sun, Kaiyu and Hong, Tianzhen},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.enbuild.2017.04.065},
journal = {Energy and Buildings},
number = C,
volume = 146,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on May 6, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

Save / Share:
  • Today, many large commercial buildings use sophisticated building automation systems (BASs) to manage a wide range of building equipment. While the capabilities of BASs have increased over time, many buildings still do not fully use the BAS’s capabilities and are not properly commissioned, operated or maintained, which leads to inefficient operation, increased energy use, and reduced lifetimes of the equipment. This paper investigates the energy savings potential of several common HVAC system re-tuning measures on a typical large office building, using the Department of Energy’s building energy modeling software, EnergyPlus. The baseline prototype model uses roughly as much energy asmore » an average large office building in existing building stock, but does not utilize any re-tuning measures. Individual re-tuning measures simulated against this baseline include automatic schedule adjustments, damper minimum flow adjustments, thermostat adjustments, as well as dynamic resets (set points that change continuously with building and/or outdoor conditions) to static pressure, supply-air temperature, condenser water temperature, chilled and hot water temperature, and chilled and hot water differential pressure set points. Six combinations of these individual measures have been formulated – each designed to conform to limitations to implementation of certain individual measures that might exist in typical buildings. All the individual measures and combinations were simulated in 16 climate locations representative of specific U.S. climate zones. The modeling results suggest that the most effective energy savings measures are those that affect the demand-side of the building (air-systems and schedules). Many of the demand-side individual measures were capable of reducing annual total HVAC system energy consumption by over 20% in most cities that were modeled. Supply side measures affecting HVAC plant conditions were only modestly successful (less than 5% annual HVAC energy savings for most cities for all measures). Combining many of the re-tuning measures revealed deep savings potential. Some of the more aggressive combinations revealed 35-75% reductions in annual HVAC energy consumption, depending on climate and building vintage.« less
  • Energy conservation evaluations have previously concerned availability and price of fuels and specific energy conservation measures designed to reduce the impact of rising energy costs. Maximum payback periods were established by management for general use. As interest rates rose, payback periods were lowered, although cash flows were discounted at the cost of capital for major capital expenditures. These methods are continuing to be used along with attempts at life-cycle costing. The author says these methods are wrong if allowances are not made for the effect of rising fuel costs. In order to illustrate the financial impact of rising fuel costs,more » the present value of savings generated by an energy-saving project was plotted on a graph against percentage fuel-cost escalation rate. It was assumed in the example that the life expectancy of the project is 20 years. The analytical formula is described, and it was found that rising fuel costs are easily accountable with the formula given. (MCW)« less