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Title: Subalpine and alpine species range shifts with climate change: temperature and soil moisture manipulations to test species and population responses (Final Report)

Abstract

The Alpine Treeline Warming Experiment (ATWE) was established in 2008-2009 to experimentally test how climate change would affect species ranges at and beyond the cold edge limits of forest growth. One key finding was that warming can hinder upslope tree migration by increasing seedling water stress and reducing seedling survival. We found evidence for more conservative traits in seedlings from high elevation tree populations, which may further slow tree expansion into the current alpine. In the alpine, warming may only increase productivity if summer rain increases, as dominant alpine life forms were negatively affected by heating unless water was added. The ATWE experimental design and focus on dynamic vegetation were novel, and the setting at the mountain treeline transition was important to understanding effects of climate variability and change on water resources, carbon cycling and biodiversity. We ended climate manipulations and removed associated infrastructure from the field in 2016 following 8 years of data collection. To date, 5 MS theses and 18 peer-reviewed papers have been published or accepted (including one that yielded the cover image in Global Change Biology, left), and 1 PhD thesis and at least 5 papers are in review or active development. Numerous past seasonal andmore » long-term field staff have gone on to graduate school, and subsequently to research positions as university faculty or agency scientists. PI Kueppers continues collecting data on soil microclimate and seedling survival for long-lived tree species to fill a critical gap in knowledge regarding the seedling-to-sapling transition across species and elevations. Primary project data is housed on the project’s virtual server, organized according to topic. Published data and model code is available either through the project website or via other permanent archives. Our results are influencing understanding and modeling of climate and genetic constraints on dynamic vegetation change across the landscape, particularly in the mountains of the Western U.S.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States)
  2. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  3. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  4. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)
  5. United States Geological Survey (USGS), Reston, VA (United States); Boise State Univ., ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Climate and Environmental Sciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
1414588
Report Number(s):
DOE-UCM-64457
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-07ER64457
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Kueppers, Lara M., Torn, Margaret, Harte, John, Mitton, Jeffry, and Germino, Matthew. Subalpine and alpine species range shifts with climate change: temperature and soil moisture manipulations to test species and population responses (Final Report). United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1414588.
Kueppers, Lara M., Torn, Margaret, Harte, John, Mitton, Jeffry, & Germino, Matthew. Subalpine and alpine species range shifts with climate change: temperature and soil moisture manipulations to test species and population responses (Final Report). United States. doi:10.2172/1414588.
Kueppers, Lara M., Torn, Margaret, Harte, John, Mitton, Jeffry, and Germino, Matthew. Fri . "Subalpine and alpine species range shifts with climate change: temperature and soil moisture manipulations to test species and population responses (Final Report)". United States. doi:10.2172/1414588. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1414588.
@article{osti_1414588,
title = {Subalpine and alpine species range shifts with climate change: temperature and soil moisture manipulations to test species and population responses (Final Report)},
author = {Kueppers, Lara M. and Torn, Margaret and Harte, John and Mitton, Jeffry and Germino, Matthew},
abstractNote = {The Alpine Treeline Warming Experiment (ATWE) was established in 2008-2009 to experimentally test how climate change would affect species ranges at and beyond the cold edge limits of forest growth. One key finding was that warming can hinder upslope tree migration by increasing seedling water stress and reducing seedling survival. We found evidence for more conservative traits in seedlings from high elevation tree populations, which may further slow tree expansion into the current alpine. In the alpine, warming may only increase productivity if summer rain increases, as dominant alpine life forms were negatively affected by heating unless water was added. The ATWE experimental design and focus on dynamic vegetation were novel, and the setting at the mountain treeline transition was important to understanding effects of climate variability and change on water resources, carbon cycling and biodiversity. We ended climate manipulations and removed associated infrastructure from the field in 2016 following 8 years of data collection. To date, 5 MS theses and 18 peer-reviewed papers have been published or accepted (including one that yielded the cover image in Global Change Biology, left), and 1 PhD thesis and at least 5 papers are in review or active development. Numerous past seasonal and long-term field staff have gone on to graduate school, and subsequently to research positions as university faculty or agency scientists. PI Kueppers continues collecting data on soil microclimate and seedling survival for long-lived tree species to fill a critical gap in knowledge regarding the seedling-to-sapling transition across species and elevations. Primary project data is housed on the project’s virtual server, organized according to topic. Published data and model code is available either through the project website or via other permanent archives. Our results are influencing understanding and modeling of climate and genetic constraints on dynamic vegetation change across the landscape, particularly in the mountains of the Western U.S.},
doi = {10.2172/1414588},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}