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Title: Hydrological Drought in the Anthropocene: Impacts of Local Water Extraction and Reservoir Regulation in the U.S.: Hydrological Drought in the Anthropocene

Abstract

Hydrological drought is a substantial negative deviation from normal hydrologic conditions and is influenced by climate and human activities such as water management. By perturbing the streamflow regime, climate change and water management may significantly alter drought characteristics in the future. Here we utilize a high-resolution integrated modeling framework that represents water management in terms of both local surface water extraction and reservoir regulation, and use the Standardized Streamflow Index (SSI) to quantify hydrological drought. We explore the impacts of water management on hydrological drought over the contiguous US in a warming climate with and without emissions mitigation. Despite the uncertainty of climate change impacts, local surface water extraction consistently intensifies drought that dominates at the regional to national scale. However, reservoir regulation alleviates drought by enhancing summer flow downstream of reservoirs. The relative dominance of drought intensification or relief is largely determined by the water demand, with drought intensification dominating in regions with intense water demand such as the Great Plains and California, while drought relief dominates in regions with low water demand. At the national level, water management increases the spatial extent of extreme drought despite some alleviations of moderate to severe drought. In an emissions mitigation scenariomore » with increased irrigation demand for bioenergy production, water management intensifies drought more than the business-as-usual scenario at the national level, so the impacts of emissions mitigation must be evaluated by considering its benefit in reducing warming and evapotranspiration against its effects on increasing water demand and intensifying drought.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [4]; ORCiD logo [5];  [5]; ORCiD logo [6]; ORCiD logo [6];  [5]; ORCiD logo [7];  [8]
  1. State Key Laboratory of Hydro-science and Engineering, Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing China; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA
  2. State Key Laboratory of Hydro-science and Engineering, Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing China
  3. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Now at Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences and Institute on Ecosystems, Montana State University, Bozeman MT USA
  4. Glenn Department of Civil Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson SC USA
  5. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA
  6. The Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Earth System Modeling, and Center for Earth System Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing China
  7. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman WA USA
  8. State Key Laboratory of Hydro-science and Engineering, Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing China; State Key Laboratory of Simulation and Regulation of Water Cycle in River Basin, China Institute of Hydropower and Water Resources, Beijing China
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1414545
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-121352
Journal ID: ISSN 2169-897X; KP1703030
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres; Journal Volume: 122; Journal Issue: 21
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Wan, Wenhua, Zhao, Jianshi, Li, Hong-Yi, Mishra, Ashok, Ruby Leung, L., Hejazi, Mohamad, Wang, Wei, Lu, Hui, Deng, Zhiqun, Demissisie, Yonas, and Wang, Hao. Hydrological Drought in the Anthropocene: Impacts of Local Water Extraction and Reservoir Regulation in the U.S.: Hydrological Drought in the Anthropocene. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2017JD026899.
Wan, Wenhua, Zhao, Jianshi, Li, Hong-Yi, Mishra, Ashok, Ruby Leung, L., Hejazi, Mohamad, Wang, Wei, Lu, Hui, Deng, Zhiqun, Demissisie, Yonas, & Wang, Hao. Hydrological Drought in the Anthropocene: Impacts of Local Water Extraction and Reservoir Regulation in the U.S.: Hydrological Drought in the Anthropocene. United States. doi:10.1002/2017JD026899.
Wan, Wenhua, Zhao, Jianshi, Li, Hong-Yi, Mishra, Ashok, Ruby Leung, L., Hejazi, Mohamad, Wang, Wei, Lu, Hui, Deng, Zhiqun, Demissisie, Yonas, and Wang, Hao. Fri . "Hydrological Drought in the Anthropocene: Impacts of Local Water Extraction and Reservoir Regulation in the U.S.: Hydrological Drought in the Anthropocene". United States. doi:10.1002/2017JD026899.
@article{osti_1414545,
title = {Hydrological Drought in the Anthropocene: Impacts of Local Water Extraction and Reservoir Regulation in the U.S.: Hydrological Drought in the Anthropocene},
author = {Wan, Wenhua and Zhao, Jianshi and Li, Hong-Yi and Mishra, Ashok and Ruby Leung, L. and Hejazi, Mohamad and Wang, Wei and Lu, Hui and Deng, Zhiqun and Demissisie, Yonas and Wang, Hao},
abstractNote = {Hydrological drought is a substantial negative deviation from normal hydrologic conditions and is influenced by climate and human activities such as water management. By perturbing the streamflow regime, climate change and water management may significantly alter drought characteristics in the future. Here we utilize a high-resolution integrated modeling framework that represents water management in terms of both local surface water extraction and reservoir regulation, and use the Standardized Streamflow Index (SSI) to quantify hydrological drought. We explore the impacts of water management on hydrological drought over the contiguous US in a warming climate with and without emissions mitigation. Despite the uncertainty of climate change impacts, local surface water extraction consistently intensifies drought that dominates at the regional to national scale. However, reservoir regulation alleviates drought by enhancing summer flow downstream of reservoirs. The relative dominance of drought intensification or relief is largely determined by the water demand, with drought intensification dominating in regions with intense water demand such as the Great Plains and California, while drought relief dominates in regions with low water demand. At the national level, water management increases the spatial extent of extreme drought despite some alleviations of moderate to severe drought. In an emissions mitigation scenario with increased irrigation demand for bioenergy production, water management intensifies drought more than the business-as-usual scenario at the national level, so the impacts of emissions mitigation must be evaluated by considering its benefit in reducing warming and evapotranspiration against its effects on increasing water demand and intensifying drought.},
doi = {10.1002/2017JD026899},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres},
number = 21,
volume = 122,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Nov 03 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Nov 03 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}