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Title: Regional contribution to variability and trends of global gross primary productivity

Abstract

Terrestrial gross primary productivity (GPP) is the largest component of the global carbon cycle and a key process for understanding land ecosystems dynamics. In this study, we used GPP estimates from a combination of eight global biome models participating in the Inter-Sectoral Impact-Model Intercomparison Project phase 2a (ISIMIP2a), the Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) GPP product, and a data-driven product (Model Tree Ensemble, MTE) to study the spatiotemporal variability of GPP at the regional and global levels. We found the 2000-2010 total global GPP estimated from the model ensemble to be 117±13 Pg C yr-1 (mean ± 1 standard deviation), which was higher than MODIS (112 Pg C yr-1), and close to the MTE (120 Pg C yr-1). The spatial patterns of MODIS, MTE and ISIMIP2a GPP generally agree well, but their temporal trends are different, and the seasonality and inter-annual variability of GPP at the regional and global levels are not completely consistent. For the model ensemble, Tropical Latin America contributes the most to global GPP, Asian regions contribute the most to the global GPP trend, the Northern Hemisphere regions dominate the global GPP seasonal variations, and Oceania is likely the largest contributor to inter-annual variability of global GPP. However,more » we observed large uncertainties across the eight ISIMIP2a models, which are probably due to the differences in the formulation of underlying photosynthetic processes. The results of this study are useful in understanding the contributions of different regions to global GPP and its spatiotemporal variability, how the model- and observational-based GPP estimates differ from each other in time and space, and the relative strength of the eight models. Our results also highlight the models’ ability to capture the seasonality of GPP that are essential for understanding the inter-annual and seasonal variability of GPP as a major component of the carbon cycle.« less

Authors:
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Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1414522
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-128641
Journal ID: ISSN 1748-9326
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Research Letters; Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 10
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Chen, Min, Rafique, Rashid, Asrar, Ghassem R., Bond-Lamberty, Ben, Ciais, Philippe, Zhao, Fang, Reyer, Christopher P. O., Ostberg, Sebastian, Chang, Jinfeng, Ito, Akihiko, Yang, Jia, Zeng, Ning, Kalnay, Eugenia, West, Tristram, Leng, Guoyong, Francois, Louis, Munhoven, Guy, Henrot, Alexandra, Tian, Hanqin, Pan, Shufen, Nishina, Kazuya, Viovy, Nicolas, Morfopoulos, Catherine, Betts, Richard, Schaphoff, Sibyll, Steinkamp, Jörg, and Hickler, Thomas. Regional contribution to variability and trends of global gross primary productivity. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/aa8978.
Chen, Min, Rafique, Rashid, Asrar, Ghassem R., Bond-Lamberty, Ben, Ciais, Philippe, Zhao, Fang, Reyer, Christopher P. O., Ostberg, Sebastian, Chang, Jinfeng, Ito, Akihiko, Yang, Jia, Zeng, Ning, Kalnay, Eugenia, West, Tristram, Leng, Guoyong, Francois, Louis, Munhoven, Guy, Henrot, Alexandra, Tian, Hanqin, Pan, Shufen, Nishina, Kazuya, Viovy, Nicolas, Morfopoulos, Catherine, Betts, Richard, Schaphoff, Sibyll, Steinkamp, Jörg, & Hickler, Thomas. Regional contribution to variability and trends of global gross primary productivity. United States. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/aa8978.
Chen, Min, Rafique, Rashid, Asrar, Ghassem R., Bond-Lamberty, Ben, Ciais, Philippe, Zhao, Fang, Reyer, Christopher P. O., Ostberg, Sebastian, Chang, Jinfeng, Ito, Akihiko, Yang, Jia, Zeng, Ning, Kalnay, Eugenia, West, Tristram, Leng, Guoyong, Francois, Louis, Munhoven, Guy, Henrot, Alexandra, Tian, Hanqin, Pan, Shufen, Nishina, Kazuya, Viovy, Nicolas, Morfopoulos, Catherine, Betts, Richard, Schaphoff, Sibyll, Steinkamp, Jörg, and Hickler, Thomas. Thu . "Regional contribution to variability and trends of global gross primary productivity". United States. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/aa8978.
@article{osti_1414522,
title = {Regional contribution to variability and trends of global gross primary productivity},
author = {Chen, Min and Rafique, Rashid and Asrar, Ghassem R. and Bond-Lamberty, Ben and Ciais, Philippe and Zhao, Fang and Reyer, Christopher P. O. and Ostberg, Sebastian and Chang, Jinfeng and Ito, Akihiko and Yang, Jia and Zeng, Ning and Kalnay, Eugenia and West, Tristram and Leng, Guoyong and Francois, Louis and Munhoven, Guy and Henrot, Alexandra and Tian, Hanqin and Pan, Shufen and Nishina, Kazuya and Viovy, Nicolas and Morfopoulos, Catherine and Betts, Richard and Schaphoff, Sibyll and Steinkamp, Jörg and Hickler, Thomas},
abstractNote = {Terrestrial gross primary productivity (GPP) is the largest component of the global carbon cycle and a key process for understanding land ecosystems dynamics. In this study, we used GPP estimates from a combination of eight global biome models participating in the Inter-Sectoral Impact-Model Intercomparison Project phase 2a (ISIMIP2a), the Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) GPP product, and a data-driven product (Model Tree Ensemble, MTE) to study the spatiotemporal variability of GPP at the regional and global levels. We found the 2000-2010 total global GPP estimated from the model ensemble to be 117±13 Pg C yr-1 (mean ± 1 standard deviation), which was higher than MODIS (112 Pg C yr-1), and close to the MTE (120 Pg C yr-1). The spatial patterns of MODIS, MTE and ISIMIP2a GPP generally agree well, but their temporal trends are different, and the seasonality and inter-annual variability of GPP at the regional and global levels are not completely consistent. For the model ensemble, Tropical Latin America contributes the most to global GPP, Asian regions contribute the most to the global GPP trend, the Northern Hemisphere regions dominate the global GPP seasonal variations, and Oceania is likely the largest contributor to inter-annual variability of global GPP. However, we observed large uncertainties across the eight ISIMIP2a models, which are probably due to the differences in the formulation of underlying photosynthetic processes. The results of this study are useful in understanding the contributions of different regions to global GPP and its spatiotemporal variability, how the model- and observational-based GPP estimates differ from each other in time and space, and the relative strength of the eight models. Our results also highlight the models’ ability to capture the seasonality of GPP that are essential for understanding the inter-annual and seasonal variability of GPP as a major component of the carbon cycle.},
doi = {10.1088/1748-9326/aa8978},
journal = {Environmental Research Letters},
number = 10,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Sep 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}