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Title: Evaluation of Additively Manufactured Materials for Nuclear Plant Components

Abstract

Powder bed fusion Direct Metal Laser Melting (DMLM) is an evolving additive manufacturing (AM) fabrication technology that is providing high performance parts to many industries. This technology has significant promise for use in building components for nuclear power plants. Implementation of materials produced using this and similar processes offer a potential step change in efficiency for complex parts production and hence a potential for innovative design as well as cost savings for components in the future. Properties of AM Type 316L have been reported in previous work, showing properties that match wrought properties. The fine grain structure may even lead to better environmental resistance. However, there is a need to confirm the behavior of these innovative materials after exposure to radiation if this innovative technology is to be used in current and future nuclear applications. This paper discusses new efforts being explored via a joint program between GE Hitachi (GEH) and INL (Idaho National laboratory) aimed at developing corresponding un-irradiated and irradiated data for AM materials. This paper will present data for both Type 316L stainless steel, a single-phase alloy, and Ni-base Alloy 718, a precipitation hardened alloy, manufactured using AM. This paper, serving as a progress report, will presentmore » the mechanical property and microstructural data for both Type 316L and 718 AM alloys to assess their correspondence to wrought alloy data and establish a baseline for future comparison to irradiated properties. The paper will end by discussing the requirements for using these and other additively manufactured materials in future reactor component applications where irradiated data is not available.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1414443
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-17-41975
Journal ID: ISSN 2367--1181
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 18th International Conference on Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems -- Water Reactors, Portland, Oregon, USA, August 13–17, 2017
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 316 Stainless Steel; Additive Manufacturing; Fracture Toughness; Inconel 718; Irradiation; SCC

Citation Formats

Horn, R. M., Conner, M., Webber, D., Jackson, J., and Bolger, F. Evaluation of Additively Manufactured Materials for Nuclear Plant Components. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-67244-1_63.
Horn, R. M., Conner, M., Webber, D., Jackson, J., & Bolger, F. Evaluation of Additively Manufactured Materials for Nuclear Plant Components. United States. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-67244-1_63.
Horn, R. M., Conner, M., Webber, D., Jackson, J., and Bolger, F. Thu . "Evaluation of Additively Manufactured Materials for Nuclear Plant Components". United States. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-67244-1_63. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1414443.
@article{osti_1414443,
title = {Evaluation of Additively Manufactured Materials for Nuclear Plant Components},
author = {Horn, R. M. and Conner, M. and Webber, D. and Jackson, J. and Bolger, F.},
abstractNote = {Powder bed fusion Direct Metal Laser Melting (DMLM) is an evolving additive manufacturing (AM) fabrication technology that is providing high performance parts to many industries. This technology has significant promise for use in building components for nuclear power plants. Implementation of materials produced using this and similar processes offer a potential step change in efficiency for complex parts production and hence a potential for innovative design as well as cost savings for components in the future. Properties of AM Type 316L have been reported in previous work, showing properties that match wrought properties. The fine grain structure may even lead to better environmental resistance. However, there is a need to confirm the behavior of these innovative materials after exposure to radiation if this innovative technology is to be used in current and future nuclear applications. This paper discusses new efforts being explored via a joint program between GE Hitachi (GEH) and INL (Idaho National laboratory) aimed at developing corresponding un-irradiated and irradiated data for AM materials. This paper will present data for both Type 316L stainless steel, a single-phase alloy, and Ni-base Alloy 718, a precipitation hardened alloy, manufactured using AM. This paper, serving as a progress report, will present the mechanical property and microstructural data for both Type 316L and 718 AM alloys to assess their correspondence to wrought alloy data and establish a baseline for future comparison to irradiated properties. The paper will end by discussing the requirements for using these and other additively manufactured materials in future reactor component applications where irradiated data is not available.},
doi = {10.1007/978-3-319-67244-1_63},
journal = {},
issn = {2367--1181},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {6}
}

Conference:
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