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Title: The production rate of cosmogenic deuterium at the Moon's surface

Abstract

The hydrogen (D/H) isotope ratio is a key tracer for the source of planetary water. However, secondary processes such as solar wind implantation and cosmic ray induced spallation reactions have modified the primordial D/H signature of ‘water’ in all rocks and soils recovered on the Moon. We re-evaluate the production rate of cosmogenic deuterium (D) at the Moon's surface through ion microprobe analyses of hydrogen isotopes in olivines from eight Apollo 12 and 15 mare basalts. Furthermore, these in situ measurements are complemented by CO2 laser extraction-static mass spectrometry analyses of cosmogenic noble gas nuclides ( 3He, 21Ne, 38Ar). Cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages of the mare basalts, derived from their cosmogenic 21Ne content, range from 60 to 422 Ma. These CRE ages are 35% higher, on average, than the published values for the same samples. The amount of D detected in the olivines increases linearly with increasing CRE ages, consistent with a production rate of (2.17±0.11)×10 -12 mol(g rock) -1 Ma -1. This value is more than twice as high as previous estimates for the production of D by galactic cosmic rays, indicating that for water-poor lunar samples, i.e., samples with water concentrations ≤50 ppm, corrected D/H ratios havemore » been severely overestimated.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Petrographic and Geochemical Research Center, Vandoeuvre les Nancy Cedex (France)
  2. Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Geophysical Sciences, Chicago Center for Cosmochemistry
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
OSTI Identifier:
1414349
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-731359
Journal ID: ISSN 0012-821X
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344; NNX09AG39G
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 474; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0012-821X
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; deuterium; water; noble gases; cosmic rays; olivine; Moon

Citation Formats

Füri, Evelyn, Deloule, Etienne, and Trappitsch, Reto. The production rate of cosmogenic deuterium at the Moon's surface. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2017.05.042.
Füri, Evelyn, Deloule, Etienne, & Trappitsch, Reto. The production rate of cosmogenic deuterium at the Moon's surface. United States. doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2017.05.042.
Füri, Evelyn, Deloule, Etienne, and Trappitsch, Reto. Mon . "The production rate of cosmogenic deuterium at the Moon's surface". United States. doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2017.05.042.
@article{osti_1414349,
title = {The production rate of cosmogenic deuterium at the Moon's surface},
author = {Füri, Evelyn and Deloule, Etienne and Trappitsch, Reto},
abstractNote = {The hydrogen (D/H) isotope ratio is a key tracer for the source of planetary water. However, secondary processes such as solar wind implantation and cosmic ray induced spallation reactions have modified the primordial D/H signature of ‘water’ in all rocks and soils recovered on the Moon. We re-evaluate the production rate of cosmogenic deuterium (D) at the Moon's surface through ion microprobe analyses of hydrogen isotopes in olivines from eight Apollo 12 and 15 mare basalts. Furthermore, these in situ measurements are complemented by CO2 laser extraction-static mass spectrometry analyses of cosmogenic noble gas nuclides (3He, 21Ne, 38Ar). Cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages of the mare basalts, derived from their cosmogenic 21Ne content, range from 60 to 422 Ma. These CRE ages are 35% higher, on average, than the published values for the same samples. The amount of D detected in the olivines increases linearly with increasing CRE ages, consistent with a production rate of (2.17±0.11)×10-12 mol(g rock)-1 Ma-1. This value is more than twice as high as previous estimates for the production of D by galactic cosmic rays, indicating that for water-poor lunar samples, i.e., samples with water concentrations ≤50 ppm, corrected D/H ratios have been severely overestimated.},
doi = {10.1016/j.epsl.2017.05.042},
journal = {Earth and Planetary Science Letters},
number = C,
volume = 474,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 03 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Jul 03 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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  • Cosmogenic dating, using in situ {sup 26}Al and {sup 10}Be in quartz pebbles from alluvial terrace surfaces, constrains the late Holocene slip rate on the Xidatan segment of the Kunlun fault in northeastern Tibet. Two terrace risers offset by 24 {+-} 3 and 33 {+-} 4 m, having respective ages of 1799 {+-} 388 and 2914 {+-} 471 yr, imply a slip rate of 12.1 {+-} 2.6 mm/yr. The full range of ages obtained ({le}22.8 k.y., most of them between 6.7 and 1.4 k.y.) confirm that terrace deposition and incision, hence landform evolution, are modulated by post-glacial climate change. Coupledmore » with minimum offsets of 9--12 m, this slip rate implies that great earthquakes (M {approximately}8) with a recurrence time of 800--1000 yr, rupture the Kunlun fault near 94 E.« less
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