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Title: Accumulation of coal combustion residues and their immunological effects in the yellow-bellied slider ( Trachemys scripta scripta )

Authors:
; ; ; ORCiD logo; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1414331
Grant/Contract Number:
FC09-07SR22506
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Pollution
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 224; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-12-20 12:31:09; Journal ID: ISSN 0269-7491
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Haskins, David L., Hamilton, Matthew T., Jones, Amanda L., Finger, Jr., John W., Bringolf, Robert B., and Tuberville, Tracey D. Accumulation of coal combustion residues and their immunological effects in the yellow-bellied slider ( Trachemys scripta scripta ). United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.envpol.2017.01.048.
Haskins, David L., Hamilton, Matthew T., Jones, Amanda L., Finger, Jr., John W., Bringolf, Robert B., & Tuberville, Tracey D. Accumulation of coal combustion residues and their immunological effects in the yellow-bellied slider ( Trachemys scripta scripta ). United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.envpol.2017.01.048.
Haskins, David L., Hamilton, Matthew T., Jones, Amanda L., Finger, Jr., John W., Bringolf, Robert B., and Tuberville, Tracey D. Mon . "Accumulation of coal combustion residues and their immunological effects in the yellow-bellied slider ( Trachemys scripta scripta )". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.envpol.2017.01.048.
@article{osti_1414331,
title = {Accumulation of coal combustion residues and their immunological effects in the yellow-bellied slider ( Trachemys scripta scripta )},
author = {Haskins, David L. and Hamilton, Matthew T. and Jones, Amanda L. and Finger, Jr., John W. and Bringolf, Robert B. and Tuberville, Tracey D.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.envpol.2017.01.048},
journal = {Environmental Pollution},
number = C,
volume = 224,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.envpol.2017.01.048

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Assessments of ecological risk require accurate predictions of contaminant dynamics in natural populations. However, simple deterministic models that assume constant uptake rates and elimination fractions may compromise both their ecological realism and their general application to animals with variable metabolism or diets. In particular, the temperature-dependent model of metabolic rates characteristic of ectotherms may lead to significant differences between observed and predicted contaminant kinetics. We examined the influence of a seasonally variable thermal environment on predicting the uptake and annual cycling of contaminants by ectotherms, using a temperature-dependent model of {sup 137}Cs kinetics in free-living yellow-bellied turtles, Trachemys scripta. Wemore » compared predictions from this model with those of deterministics negative exponential and flexibly shaped Richards sigmoidal models. Concentrations of {sup 137}Cs in a population if this species in Pond B, a radionuclide-contaminated nuclear reactor cooling reservoir, and {sup 137}Cs uptake by the uncontaminated turtles held captive in Pond B for 4 yr confirmed both the pattern of uptake and the equilibrium concentrations predicted by the temperature-dependent model. Almost 90% of the variance on the predicted time-integrated {sup 137}Cs concentration was explainable by linear relationships with model paramaters. The model was also relatively insensitive to uncertainties in the estimates of ambient temperature, suggesting that adequate estimates of temperature-dependent ingestion and elimination may require relatively few measurements of ambient conditions at sites of interest. Analyses of Richards sigmoidal models of {sup 137}Cs uptake indicated significant differences from a negative exponential trajectory in the 1st yr after the turtles` release into Pond B. 76 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.« less
  • Juvenile slider turtles (Trachemys scripta) were used in laboratory experiments to determine the effects of dietary protein and ambient temperature on growth rates, food consumption rates, digestion rates and digestive efficiencies, in order to better understand how the interactive roles these environmental factors may potentially influence body sizes and growth rates of individuals among wild slider turtle populations. Changes in plastron length, carapace length and body mass were significantly greater for Trachemys scripta eating 25% and 40% crude protein diets than for those eating 10% crude protein. Those consuming 10% crude protein showed significant decreases in all measurements of bodymore » size over a 13 wk period. These data suggest that dietary protein may be an important nutritional component to the growth of juvenile slider turtles, and that elevated thermal conditions, combined with a high dietary protein availability, may in part explain the exceedingly high growth rates of slider turtles attained in certain wild populations. 63 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.« less
  • The adaptive strategy of the slider turtle, Pseudemys scripta, in terms of age and size at sexual maturity is discussed. Populations from a natural aquatic habitat and from a cooling reservoir on the US DOE Savannah River Plant are compared. (HCR)