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Title: An automated lab-scale flue gas permeation membrane testing system at the National Carbon Capture Center

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1414013
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Membrane Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 533; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-12-19 06:48:30; Journal ID: ISSN 0376-7388
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kusuma, Victor A., Venna, Surendar R., Wickramanayake, Shan, Dahe, Ganpat J., Myers, Christina R., O’Connor, John, Resnik, Kevin P., Anthony, Justin H., and Hopkinson, David. An automated lab-scale flue gas permeation membrane testing system at the National Carbon Capture Center. Netherlands: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.memsci.2017.02.051.
Kusuma, Victor A., Venna, Surendar R., Wickramanayake, Shan, Dahe, Ganpat J., Myers, Christina R., O’Connor, John, Resnik, Kevin P., Anthony, Justin H., & Hopkinson, David. An automated lab-scale flue gas permeation membrane testing system at the National Carbon Capture Center. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.memsci.2017.02.051.
Kusuma, Victor A., Venna, Surendar R., Wickramanayake, Shan, Dahe, Ganpat J., Myers, Christina R., O’Connor, John, Resnik, Kevin P., Anthony, Justin H., and Hopkinson, David. 2017. "An automated lab-scale flue gas permeation membrane testing system at the National Carbon Capture Center". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.memsci.2017.02.051.
@article{osti_1414013,
title = {An automated lab-scale flue gas permeation membrane testing system at the National Carbon Capture Center},
author = {Kusuma, Victor A. and Venna, Surendar R. and Wickramanayake, Shan and Dahe, Ganpat J. and Myers, Christina R. and O’Connor, John and Resnik, Kevin P. and Anthony, Justin H. and Hopkinson, David},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.memsci.2017.02.051},
journal = {Journal of Membrane Science},
number = C,
volume = 533,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on March 23, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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