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Title: Impact of the 2017 Solar Eclipse on the Smart Grid

Abstract

With the increasing interest in using solar energy as a major contributor to the use of renewable generation, and with the focus on using smart grids to optimize the use of electrical energy based on demand and resources from different locations, the need arises to know the moons position in the sky with respect to the sun. When a solar eclipse occurs, the moon disk might totally or partially shade the sun disk, which can affect the irradiance level from the sun disk, consequently affecting a resource on the electric grid. The moons position can then provide smart grid users with information about how potential total or partial solar eclipses might affect different locations on the grid so that other resources on the grid can be directed to where they might be needed when such phenomena occurs. At least five solar eclipses occur yearly at different locations on Earth, they can last 3 hours or more depending on the location, and they can affect smart grid users. On August 21, 2017, a partial and full solar eclipse occurred in many locations in the United States, including at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. Solar irradiance measurements during themore » eclipse were compared to the data generated by a model for validation at eight locations.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1413904
Report Number(s):
NREL/PO-5D00-70608
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, 11 December 2017, New Orleans, Louisiana
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; solar eclipse; direct normal irradiance; DNI; smart grid

Citation Formats

Habte, Aron M, Reda, Ibrahim M, Andreas, Afshin M, and Sengupta, Manajit. Impact of the 2017 Solar Eclipse on the Smart Grid. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Habte, Aron M, Reda, Ibrahim M, Andreas, Afshin M, & Sengupta, Manajit. Impact of the 2017 Solar Eclipse on the Smart Grid. United States.
Habte, Aron M, Reda, Ibrahim M, Andreas, Afshin M, and Sengupta, Manajit. Tue . "Impact of the 2017 Solar Eclipse on the Smart Grid". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1413904.
@article{osti_1413904,
title = {Impact of the 2017 Solar Eclipse on the Smart Grid},
author = {Habte, Aron M and Reda, Ibrahim M and Andreas, Afshin M and Sengupta, Manajit},
abstractNote = {With the increasing interest in using solar energy as a major contributor to the use of renewable generation, and with the focus on using smart grids to optimize the use of electrical energy based on demand and resources from different locations, the need arises to know the moons position in the sky with respect to the sun. When a solar eclipse occurs, the moon disk might totally or partially shade the sun disk, which can affect the irradiance level from the sun disk, consequently affecting a resource on the electric grid. The moons position can then provide smart grid users with information about how potential total or partial solar eclipses might affect different locations on the grid so that other resources on the grid can be directed to where they might be needed when such phenomena occurs. At least five solar eclipses occur yearly at different locations on Earth, they can last 3 hours or more depending on the location, and they can affect smart grid users. On August 21, 2017, a partial and full solar eclipse occurred in many locations in the United States, including at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. Solar irradiance measurements during the eclipse were compared to the data generated by a model for validation at eight locations.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Dec 12 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Dec 12 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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