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Title: Influence of habitat heterogeneity on the community structure of deep-sea harpacticoid communities from a canyon and an escarpment site on the continental rise off California

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1413798
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-05ER64070; FG02-02ER63456; FG02-ER63721-1022499-0009743; FC26-00NT40929; 901007
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Deep Sea Research Part 1. Oceanographic Research Papers
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 123; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-12-18 06:24:26; Journal ID: ISSN 0967-0637
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
France
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Thistle, David, Sedlacek, Linda, Carman, Kevin R., and Barry, James P. Influence of habitat heterogeneity on the community structure of deep-sea harpacticoid communities from a canyon and an escarpment site on the continental rise off California. France: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.dsr.2017.03.005.
Thistle, David, Sedlacek, Linda, Carman, Kevin R., & Barry, James P. Influence of habitat heterogeneity on the community structure of deep-sea harpacticoid communities from a canyon and an escarpment site on the continental rise off California. France. doi:10.1016/j.dsr.2017.03.005.
Thistle, David, Sedlacek, Linda, Carman, Kevin R., and Barry, James P. 2017. "Influence of habitat heterogeneity on the community structure of deep-sea harpacticoid communities from a canyon and an escarpment site on the continental rise off California". France. doi:10.1016/j.dsr.2017.03.005.
@article{osti_1413798,
title = {Influence of habitat heterogeneity on the community structure of deep-sea harpacticoid communities from a canyon and an escarpment site on the continental rise off California},
author = {Thistle, David and Sedlacek, Linda and Carman, Kevin R. and Barry, James P.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.dsr.2017.03.005},
journal = {Deep Sea Research Part 1. Oceanographic Research Papers},
number = C,
volume = 123,
place = {France},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on May 16, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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