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Title: In silico optimization of critical currents in superconductors

Abstract

For many technological applications of superconductors the performance of a material is determined by the highest current it can carry losslessly-the critical current. In turn, the critical current can be controlled by adding nonsuperconducting defects in the superconductor matrix. Here we report on systematic comparison of different local and global optimization strategies to predict optimal structures of pinning centers leading to the highest possible critical currents. We demonstrate performance of these methods for a superconductor with randomly placed spherical, elliptical, and columnar defects.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) (SC-21)
OSTI Identifier:
1413748
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review E; Journal Volume: 96; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY

Citation Formats

Kimmel, Gregory, Sadovskyy, Ivan A., and Glatz, Andreas. In silico optimization of critical currents in superconductors. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.96.013318.
Kimmel, Gregory, Sadovskyy, Ivan A., & Glatz, Andreas. In silico optimization of critical currents in superconductors. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.96.013318.
Kimmel, Gregory, Sadovskyy, Ivan A., and Glatz, Andreas. 2017. "In silico optimization of critical currents in superconductors". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.96.013318.
@article{osti_1413748,
title = {In silico optimization of critical currents in superconductors},
author = {Kimmel, Gregory and Sadovskyy, Ivan A. and Glatz, Andreas},
abstractNote = {For many technological applications of superconductors the performance of a material is determined by the highest current it can carry losslessly-the critical current. In turn, the critical current can be controlled by adding nonsuperconducting defects in the superconductor matrix. Here we report on systematic comparison of different local and global optimization strategies to predict optimal structures of pinning centers leading to the highest possible critical currents. We demonstrate performance of these methods for a superconductor with randomly placed spherical, elliptical, and columnar defects.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevE.96.013318},
journal = {Physical Review E},
number = 1,
volume = 96,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}
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