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Title: United States Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Component Test Facility for 760°C Steam Power Plants ComTest Project

Abstract

Following the successful completion of a 15-year effort to develop and test materials that would allow coal-fired power plants to be operated at advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) steam conditions, a United States-based consortium is presently engaged in a project to build an A-USC component test facility (ComTest). A-USC steam cycles have the potential to improve cycle efficiency, reduce fuel costs, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Current development and demonstration efforts are focused on enabling the construction of A-USC plants, operating with steam temperatures as high as 1400°F (760°C) and steam pressures up to 5000 psi (35 MPa), which can potentially increase cycle efficiencies to 47% HHV (higher heating value), or approximately 50% LHV (lower heating value), and reduce CO 2 emissions by roughly 25%, compared to today’s U.S. fleet. A-USC technology provides a lower-cost method to reduce CO 2 emissions, compared to CO 2 capture technologies, while retaining a viable coal option for owners of coal generation assets. Among the goals of the ComTest facility are to validate that components made from advanced nickel-based alloys can operate and perform under A-USC conditions, to accelerate the development of a U.S.-based supply chain for the full complement of A-USC components, and to decreasemore » the uncertainty of cost estimates for future A-USC power plants. The configuration of the ComTest facility would include the key A-USC technology components that were identified for expanded operational testing, including a gas-fired superheater, high-temperature steam piping, steam turbine valve, and cycling header component. Membrane walls in the superheater have been designed to operate at the full temperatures expected in a commercial A-USC boiler, but at a lower (intermediate) operating pressure. This superheater has been designed to increase the temperature of the steam supplied by the host utility boiler up to 1400°F (760°C). The steam turbine stop and control valve component has been designed to operate at full A-USC temperatures, and would be tested both in throttling operation and to accumulate accelerated, repetitive stroke cycles. A cycling header component has been designed to confirm the suitability of new high-temperature nickel alloys to cycling operation, expected of future coal-fired power plants. Current test plans would subject these components to A-USC operating conditions for at least 8,000 hours by September 2020. The ComTest project is managed by Energy Industries of Ohio, and technically directed by the Electric Power Research Institute, Inc., with General Electric designing the A-USC components. This consortium is completing the Detailed Engineering phase of the project, with procurement scheduled to begin in late 2017. The effort is primarily funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, through the National Energy Technology Laboratory, along with the Ohio Development Services Agency. This presentation outlines the motivation for the project, explains the project’s structure and schedule, and provides technical details on the design of the ComTest facility.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)
  2. Energy Industries of Ohio
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Industries of Ohio
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1413742
Report Number(s):
DE-FE0025064-EPRI-EIO
DOE Contract Number:
FE0025064
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 3rd Workshop on AUSC Power Plant in Rome, Italy on December 13-14, 2017 sponsored by IEA Clean Coal Centre
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Hack, Horst, and Purgert, Robert Michael. United States Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Component Test Facility for 760°C Steam Power Plants ComTest Project. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Hack, Horst, & Purgert, Robert Michael. United States Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Component Test Facility for 760°C Steam Power Plants ComTest Project. United States.
Hack, Horst, and Purgert, Robert Michael. Wed . "United States Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Component Test Facility for 760°C Steam Power Plants ComTest Project". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1413742.
@article{osti_1413742,
title = {United States Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Component Test Facility for 760°C Steam Power Plants ComTest Project},
author = {Hack, Horst and Purgert, Robert Michael},
abstractNote = {Following the successful completion of a 15-year effort to develop and test materials that would allow coal-fired power plants to be operated at advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) steam conditions, a United States-based consortium is presently engaged in a project to build an A-USC component test facility (ComTest). A-USC steam cycles have the potential to improve cycle efficiency, reduce fuel costs, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Current development and demonstration efforts are focused on enabling the construction of A-USC plants, operating with steam temperatures as high as 1400°F (760°C) and steam pressures up to 5000 psi (35 MPa), which can potentially increase cycle efficiencies to 47% HHV (higher heating value), or approximately 50% LHV (lower heating value), and reduce CO2 emissions by roughly 25%, compared to today’s U.S. fleet. A-USC technology provides a lower-cost method to reduce CO2 emissions, compared to CO2 capture technologies, while retaining a viable coal option for owners of coal generation assets. Among the goals of the ComTest facility are to validate that components made from advanced nickel-based alloys can operate and perform under A-USC conditions, to accelerate the development of a U.S.-based supply chain for the full complement of A-USC components, and to decrease the uncertainty of cost estimates for future A-USC power plants. The configuration of the ComTest facility would include the key A-USC technology components that were identified for expanded operational testing, including a gas-fired superheater, high-temperature steam piping, steam turbine valve, and cycling header component. Membrane walls in the superheater have been designed to operate at the full temperatures expected in a commercial A-USC boiler, but at a lower (intermediate) operating pressure. This superheater has been designed to increase the temperature of the steam supplied by the host utility boiler up to 1400°F (760°C). The steam turbine stop and control valve component has been designed to operate at full A-USC temperatures, and would be tested both in throttling operation and to accumulate accelerated, repetitive stroke cycles. A cycling header component has been designed to confirm the suitability of new high-temperature nickel alloys to cycling operation, expected of future coal-fired power plants. Current test plans would subject these components to A-USC operating conditions for at least 8,000 hours by September 2020. The ComTest project is managed by Energy Industries of Ohio, and technically directed by the Electric Power Research Institute, Inc., with General Electric designing the A-USC components. This consortium is completing the Detailed Engineering phase of the project, with procurement scheduled to begin in late 2017. The effort is primarily funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, through the National Energy Technology Laboratory, along with the Ohio Development Services Agency. This presentation outlines the motivation for the project, explains the project’s structure and schedule, and provides technical details on the design of the ComTest facility.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Dec 13 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Dec 13 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Conference:
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