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Title: 2D nanomaterials assembled from sequence-defined molecules

Abstract

Two dimensional (2D) nanomaterials have attracted broad interest owing to their unique physical and chemical properties with potential applications in electronics, chemistry, biology, medicine and pharmaceutics. Due to the current limitations of traditional 2D nanomaterials (e.g., graphene and graphene oxide) in tuning surface chemistry and compositions, 2D nanomaterials assembled from sequence-defined molecules (e.g., DNAs, proteins, peptides and peptoids) have recently been developed. They represent an emerging class of 2D nanomaterials with attractive physical and chemical properties. Here, we summarize the recent progress in the synthesis and applications of this type of sequence-defined 2D nanomaterials. We also discuss the challenges and opportunities in this new field.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Physical Sciences Division; State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Binghamton, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program
  2. State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Binghamton, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program
  3. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Physical Sciences Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1413460
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-129070
Journal ID: ISSN 2352-507X; PII: S2352507X17303591; TRN: US1800432
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nano-Structures & Nano-Objects
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 15; Journal ID: ISSN 2352-507X
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 2D nanomaterials; sequence-defined molecules; self-assembly; surface chemistry

Citation Formats

Mu, Peng, Zhou, Guangwen, and Chen, Chun-Long. 2D nanomaterials assembled from sequence-defined molecules. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/J.NANOSO.2017.09.010.
Mu, Peng, Zhou, Guangwen, & Chen, Chun-Long. 2D nanomaterials assembled from sequence-defined molecules. United States. doi:10.1016/J.NANOSO.2017.09.010.
Mu, Peng, Zhou, Guangwen, and Chen, Chun-Long. Sat . "2D nanomaterials assembled from sequence-defined molecules". United States. doi:10.1016/J.NANOSO.2017.09.010.
@article{osti_1413460,
title = {2D nanomaterials assembled from sequence-defined molecules},
author = {Mu, Peng and Zhou, Guangwen and Chen, Chun-Long},
abstractNote = {Two dimensional (2D) nanomaterials have attracted broad interest owing to their unique physical and chemical properties with potential applications in electronics, chemistry, biology, medicine and pharmaceutics. Due to the current limitations of traditional 2D nanomaterials (e.g., graphene and graphene oxide) in tuning surface chemistry and compositions, 2D nanomaterials assembled from sequence-defined molecules (e.g., DNAs, proteins, peptides and peptoids) have recently been developed. They represent an emerging class of 2D nanomaterials with attractive physical and chemical properties. Here, we summarize the recent progress in the synthesis and applications of this type of sequence-defined 2D nanomaterials. We also discuss the challenges and opportunities in this new field.},
doi = {10.1016/J.NANOSO.2017.09.010},
journal = {Nano-Structures & Nano-Objects},
number = ,
volume = 15,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Oct 21 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Oct 21 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on October 21, 2018
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  • Two dimensional (2D) nanomaterials have attracted broad interest owing to their unique physical and chemical properties with potential applications in electronics, chemistry, biology, medicine and pharmaceutics. Due to the current limitations of traditional 2D nanomaterials (e.g., graphene and graphene oxide) in tuning surface chemistry and compositions, 2D nanomaterials assembled from sequence-defined molecules (e.g., DNAs, proteins, peptides and peptoids) have recently been developed. They represent an emerging class of 2D nanomaterials with attractive physical and chemical properties. In this mini-review, we summarize the recent progress in the synthesis and applications of this type of sequence-defined 2D nanomaterials. The challenges and opportunitiesmore » in this new field are also discussed.« less
  • Two-dimensional (2D) materials with molecular-scale thickness have attracted increasing interest for separation, electronic, catalytic, optical, energy and biomedical applications. Although extensive research on 2D materials, such as graphene and graphene oxide, has been performed in recent years, progress is limited on self-assembly of 2D materials from sequence-specific macromolecules, especially from synthetic sequences that could exhibit lipid-like self-assembly of bilayer sheets and mimic membrane proteins for functions. The creation of such new class of materials could enable development of highly stable biomimetic membranes that exhibit cell-membrane-like molecular transport with exceptional selectively and high transport rates. Here we demonstrate self-assembly of lipid-likemore » 12-mer peptoids into extremely stable, crystalline, flexible and free-standing 2D membrane materials. As with cell membranes, upon exposure to external stimuli, these materials exhibit changes in thickness, varying from 3.5 nm to 5.6 nm. We find that self-assembly occurs through a facile crystallization process, in which inter-peptoid hydrogen bonds and enhanced hydrophobic interactions drive the formation of a highly-ordered structure. Molecular simulation confirms this is the energetically favored structure. Displaying functional groups at arbitrary locations of membrane-forming peptoids produces membranes with similar structures. This research further shows that single-layer membranes can be coated onto substrate surfaces. Moreover, membranes with mechanically-induced defects can self-repair. Given that peptoids are sequence-specific and exhibit protein-like molecular recognition with enhanced stability, we anticipate our membranes to be a robust platform tailored to specific applications.« less
  • An ability to develop sequence-defined synthetic polymers that both mimic lipid amphiphilicity for self-assembly of highly stable membrane-mimetic 2D nanomaterials and exhibit protein-like functionality would revolutionize the development of biomimetic membranes. Here we report the assembly of lipid-like peptoids into highly stable, crystalline, free-standing and self-repairing membrane-mimetic 2D nanomaterials through a facile crystallization process. Both experimental and molecular dynamics simulation results show that peptoids assemble into membranes through an anisotropic formation process. We further demonstrated the use of peptoid membranes as a robust platform to incorporate and pattern functional objects through large side-chain diversity and/or co-crystallization approaches. Similar to lipidmore » membranes, peptoid membranes exhibit changes in thickness upon exposure to external stimuli; they can coat surfaces in single layers and self-repair. We anticipate that this new class of membrane-mimetic 2D nanomaterials will provide a robust matrix for development of biomimetic membranes tailored to specific applications.« less
  • Despite recent advances in assembly of organic nanotubes, conferral of sequence-defined engineering and dynamic response characteristics to the tubules remains a challenge. Here we report a new family of highly-designable and dynamic single-walled nanotubes assembled from sequence-defined peptoids through a unique “rolling-up and closure of nanosheet” mechanism. During the assembly process, amorphous spherical particles of amphiphilic peptoid oligomers (APOs) crystallized to form well-defined nanosheets which were then folded to form single-walled peptoid nanotubes (SW-PNTs). These SW-PNTs undergo a pH-triggered, reversible contraction-expansion motion. By varying the number of hydrophobic residues of APOs, we demonstrate the tuning of PNT wall thickness andmore » diameter, and mechanical properties. AFM-based mechanical measurements indicate that PNTs are highly stiff (Young’s Modulus ~13-17 GPa), comparable to the stiffest known biological materials. We further demonstrate that the precise incorporation of functional groups within PNTs and the application of functional PNTs in water decontamination. We believe these SW-PNTs can provide a robust platform for development of biomimetic materials tailored to specific applications.« less
  • Water, and water quality, are issues of critical importance to the future of humankind. The Earth’s water supplies have been contaminated by a wide variety of industrial, military and natural sources. The need exists for an efficient separation technology to remove heavy metal and radionuclide contamination from water. Surfactant templated synthesis of mesoporous ceramics provides a versatile foundation upon which to build high efficiency environmental sorbents. These nanoporous ceramics condense a huge amount of surface area into a very small volume. These mesoporous architectures can be subsequently functionalized through molecular self-assembly. These functional mesoporous materials offer significant capabilities in termsmore » of removal of heavy metals and radionuclides from a variety of liquid media, including groundwater, contaminated oils and contaminated chemical weapons. They are highly efficient sorbents, whose rigid, open pore structure allows for rapid, efficient sorption kinetics. Their interfacial chemistry can be fine-tuned to selectively sequester a specific target species, such as heavy metals, tetrahedral oxometallate anions and radionuclides. This manuscript provides a review of the design, synthesis and performance of the sorbent materials. The role that ligand posture plays in the chemistry of these interfacial ligand fields is discussed.« less