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Title: Predicting soils and environmental impacts associated with switchgrass for bioenergy production: a DAYCENT modeling approach

Abstract

Switchgrass ( Panicum virgatum L.) production has the potential to improve soils and the environment. However, little is known about the long–term future assessment of soil and environmental impacts associated with switchgrass production. In this study, soil organic carbon (SOC), soil nitrate (NO 3), water–filled pore space (WFPS), carbon dioxide (CO 2) and nitrous oxide (N 2O) fluxes, and biomass yield from switchgrass field were predicted using DAYCENT models for 2016 through 2050. Measured data for model calibration and validation at this study site managed with nitrogen fertilization rates (N rates) (low, 0 kg N ha –1; medium, 56 kg N ha –1; and high, 112 kg N ha –1) and landscape positions (shoulder and footslope) for switchgrass production were collected from the previously published studies. Modeling results showed that the N fertilization can enhance SOC and soil NO 3, but increase soil N 2O and CO 2 fluxes. In this study, medium N fertilization was the optimum rate for enhancing switchgrass yield and reducing negative impact on the environment. Footslope position can be beneficial for improving SOC, NO 3, and yield, but contribute higher greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to those of the shoulder. An increasemore » in temperature and decrease in precipitation (climate scenarios) may reduce soil NO 3, WFPS, and N 2O flux. Switchgrass production can improve and maintain SOC and NO 3, and reduce N 2O and CO 2 fluxes over the predicted years. These findings indicate that switchgrass could be a sustainable bioenergy crop on marginally yielding lands for improving soils without significant negative impacts on the environment in the long run.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States)
  2. Farmers Edge, Shakopee, MN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Bioenergy Technologies Office; USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1413355
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1413783; OSTI ID: 1511050
Grant/Contract Number:  
FC36-05GO85041
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Global Change Biology. Bioenergy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 1757-1693
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; carbon dioxide flux; DAYCENT model; nitrous oxide flux; soil nitrate; soil organic carbon; switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.)

Citation Formats

Lai, Liming, Kumar, Sandeep, Folle, Solomon M., and Owens, Vance N. Predicting soils and environmental impacts associated with switchgrass for bioenergy production: a DAYCENT modeling approach. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/gcbb.12490.
Lai, Liming, Kumar, Sandeep, Folle, Solomon M., & Owens, Vance N. Predicting soils and environmental impacts associated with switchgrass for bioenergy production: a DAYCENT modeling approach. United States. doi:10.1111/gcbb.12490.
Lai, Liming, Kumar, Sandeep, Folle, Solomon M., and Owens, Vance N. Mon . "Predicting soils and environmental impacts associated with switchgrass for bioenergy production: a DAYCENT modeling approach". United States. doi:10.1111/gcbb.12490.
@article{osti_1413355,
title = {Predicting soils and environmental impacts associated with switchgrass for bioenergy production: a DAYCENT modeling approach},
author = {Lai, Liming and Kumar, Sandeep and Folle, Solomon M. and Owens, Vance N.},
abstractNote = {Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) production has the potential to improve soils and the environment. However, little is known about the long–term future assessment of soil and environmental impacts associated with switchgrass production. In this study, soil organic carbon (SOC), soil nitrate (NO–3), water–filled pore space (WFPS), carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes, and biomass yield from switchgrass field were predicted using DAYCENT models for 2016 through 2050. Measured data for model calibration and validation at this study site managed with nitrogen fertilization rates (N rates) (low, 0 kg N ha–1; medium, 56 kg N ha–1; and high, 112 kg N ha–1) and landscape positions (shoulder and footslope) for switchgrass production were collected from the previously published studies. Modeling results showed that the N fertilization can enhance SOC and soil NO–3, but increase soil N2O and CO2 fluxes. In this study, medium N fertilization was the optimum rate for enhancing switchgrass yield and reducing negative impact on the environment. Footslope position can be beneficial for improving SOC, NO–3, and yield, but contribute higher greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to those of the shoulder. An increase in temperature and decrease in precipitation (climate scenarios) may reduce soil NO–3, WFPS, and N2O flux. Switchgrass production can improve and maintain SOC and NO–3, and reduce N2O and CO2 fluxes over the predicted years. These findings indicate that switchgrass could be a sustainable bioenergy crop on marginally yielding lands for improving soils without significant negative impacts on the environment in the long run.},
doi = {10.1111/gcbb.12490},
journal = {Global Change Biology. Bioenergy},
issn = {1757-1693},
number = 4,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {11}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1111/gcbb.12490

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1 work
Citation information provided by
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