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Title: What Fleets Need to Know About Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversions, Retrofits, and Repowers

Abstract

Many fleet managers have opted to incorporate alternative fuels and advanced vehicles into their lineup. Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) offer a variety of choices, and there are additional options offered by aftermarket companies. There are also a myriad of ways that existing vehicles can be modified to utilize alternative fuels and other advanced technologies. Vehicle conversions and retrofit packages, along with engine repower options, can offer an ideal way to lower vehicle operating costs. This can result in long term return on investment, in addition to helping fleet managers achieve emissions and environmental goals. This report summarizes the various factors to consider when pursuing a conversion, retrofit, or repower option.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V) (Clean Cities)
OSTI Identifier:
1413023
Report Number(s):
DOE/GO-102017-5039
7783
Resource Type:
Program Document
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
alternative fuel vehicle, afv, conversion, retrofit, repower, kits, clean cities

Citation Formats

Kelly, K., and Gonzales, J. What Fleets Need to Know About Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversions, Retrofits, and Repowers. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Kelly, K., & Gonzales, J. What Fleets Need to Know About Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversions, Retrofits, and Repowers. United States.
Kelly, K., and Gonzales, J. 2017. "What Fleets Need to Know About Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversions, Retrofits, and Repowers". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1413023.
@article{osti_1413023,
title = {What Fleets Need to Know About Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversions, Retrofits, and Repowers},
author = {Kelly, K. and Gonzales, J.},
abstractNote = {Many fleet managers have opted to incorporate alternative fuels and advanced vehicles into their lineup. Original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) offer a variety of choices, and there are additional options offered by aftermarket companies. There are also a myriad of ways that existing vehicles can be modified to utilize alternative fuels and other advanced technologies. Vehicle conversions and retrofit packages, along with engine repower options, can offer an ideal way to lower vehicle operating costs. This can result in long term return on investment, in addition to helping fleet managers achieve emissions and environmental goals. This report summarizes the various factors to consider when pursuing a conversion, retrofit, or repower option.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Program Document:
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