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Title: Construction Guide to Next-Generation High-Performance Walls in Climate Zones 3-5 - Part 1: 2x6 Walls

Abstract

Part 1 of this Construction Guide to High-Performance Walls in Climate Zones 3-5 provides time-proven, practical, and cost-effective strategies for constructing durable, energy-efficient walls. It addresses walls constructed with 2x6 wood frame studs, wood structural panel (WSP) exterior sheathing, and a cladding system installed over WSP sheathing in low-rise residential buildings up to three stories high.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Home Innovation Research Labs, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Home Innovation Research Labs, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B) (Building America)
OSTI Identifier:
1412978
Report Number(s):
DOE/EE-1673-1
7753
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; Building America; Home Innovation; Construction Guide, Part 1; High-Performance Walls; Climate Zones 3-5; 2x6 wood frame studs; wood structural panel exterior sheathing; cladding system; residential

Citation Formats

Kochkin, V., and Wiehagen, J.. Construction Guide to Next-Generation High-Performance Walls in Climate Zones 3-5 - Part 1: 2x6 Walls. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1412978.
Kochkin, V., & Wiehagen, J.. Construction Guide to Next-Generation High-Performance Walls in Climate Zones 3-5 - Part 1: 2x6 Walls. United States. doi:10.2172/1412978.
Kochkin, V., and Wiehagen, J.. 2017. "Construction Guide to Next-Generation High-Performance Walls in Climate Zones 3-5 - Part 1: 2x6 Walls". United States. doi:10.2172/1412978. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1412978.
@article{osti_1412978,
title = {Construction Guide to Next-Generation High-Performance Walls in Climate Zones 3-5 - Part 1: 2x6 Walls},
author = {Kochkin, V. and Wiehagen, J.},
abstractNote = {Part 1 of this Construction Guide to High-Performance Walls in Climate Zones 3-5 provides time-proven, practical, and cost-effective strategies for constructing durable, energy-efficient walls. It addresses walls constructed with 2x6 wood frame studs, wood structural panel (WSP) exterior sheathing, and a cladding system installed over WSP sheathing in low-rise residential buildings up to three stories high.},
doi = {10.2172/1412978},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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  • Part 1 of this Construction Guide to High-Performance Walls in Climate Zones 3-5 provides time-proven, practical, and cost-effective strategies for constructing durable, energy-efficient walls. It addresses walls constructed with 2x6 wood frame studs, wood structural panel (WSP) exterior sheathing, and a cladding system installed over WSP sheathing in low-rise residential buildings up to three stories high.
  • Part 2 of this Construction Guide to High-Performance Walls in Climate Zones 3-5 provides straightforward and cost-effective strategies to construct durable, energy-efficient walls. It addresses walls constructed with 2x4 wood frame studs, wood structural panel (WSP) sheathing as wall bracing and added backing for foam sheathing, a layer of rigid foam sheathing insulation up to 1.5 inches thick over the WSP, and a cladding system installed over the foam sheathing in low-rise residential buildings up to three stories high. Walls with 2x6 framing are addressed in Part 1 of the Guide.
  • Part 2 of this Construction Guide to High-Performance Walls in Climate Zones 3-5 provides straightforward and cost-effective strategies to construct durable, energy-efficient walls. It addresses walls constructed with 2x4 wood frame studs, wood structural panel (WSP) sheathing as wall bracing and added backing for foam sheathing, a layer of rigid foam sheathing insulation up to 1.5 inches thick over the WSP, and a cladding system installed over the foam sheathing in low-rise residential buildings up to three stories high. Walls with 2x6 framing are addressed in Part 1 of the Guide.
  • The Blaze high-performance visual computing system serves the high-performance computing research and education needs of University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Blaze consists of a state-of-the-art, networked, computer cluster and ultra-high-resolution visualization system called CAVE2(TM) that is currently not available anywhere in Illinois. This system is connected via a high-speed 100-Gigabit network to the State of Illinois' I-WIRE optical network, as well as to national and international high speed networks, such as the Internet2, and the Global Lambda Integrated Facility. This enables Blaze to serve as an on-ramp to national cyberinfrastructure, such as the National Science Foundation’s Blue Waters petascalemore » computer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the Department of Energy’s Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) at Argonne National Laboratory. DOE award # DE-SC005067, leveraged with NSF award #CNS-0959053 for “Development of the Next-Generation CAVE Virtual Environment (NG-CAVE),” enabled us to create a first-of-its-kind high-performance visual computing system. The UIC Electronic Visualization Laboratory (EVL) worked with two U.S. companies to advance their commercial products and maintain U.S. leadership in the global information technology economy. New applications are being enabled with the CAVE2/Blaze visual computing system that is advancing scientific research and education in the U.S. and globally, and help train the next-generation workforce.« less
  • As a result of steadily rising energy costs, construction practice for light-frame wood structure has changed over the past few years. The use of 6-inch-thick walls and application of high-'R'-value, low-permeance sheathings to 4-inch walls has caused concern for the changing moisture patterns that may occur in walls. To observe actual moisture patterns and the potential for condensation, a test structure was constructed near Madison, Wis., for exposure of eight types of insulated wall panels at controlled indoor conditions and typical outdoor weather conditions. Panels were instrumented with moisture sensors and tested without (Phase 1) and with (Phase 2) penetrationsmore » (electrical outlets) in the indoor surface. Continuous vapor retarders effectively prevented condensation; asphalted paper stapled between studs was inadequate. The installation of an electrical outlet changed the moisture profile and resulted in some condensation in most panels. Moisture levels on the back of siding in most Phase 2 panels have been known to produce buckling in long sections of hardboard siding. Although streaking occurred on the siding of two types of Phase 1 panels and three Phase 2 types, and some condensation occurred in all types of Phase 2 panels, there was no long-term accumulation of free water in the structure. The moisture content of framing remained below 12 percent throughout the 2-year study. There was no apparent increase in condensation potential with the addition of low-permeance foam sheathing in this study with controlled indoor conditions.« less