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Title: iPTF15dtg: a double-peaked Type Ic supernova from a massive progenitor

Abstract

Type Ic supernovae (SNe Ic) arise from the core-collapse of H- (and He-) poor stars, which could either be single Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars or lower-mass stars stripped of their envelope by a companion. Their light curves are radioactively powered and usually show a fast rise to peak (~10-15 d), without any early (in the first few days) emission bumps (with the exception of broad-lined SNe Ic) as sometimes seen for other types of stripped-envelope SNe (e.g., Type IIb SN 1993J and Type Ib SN 2008D). Here, we have studied iPTF15dtg, a spectroscopically normal SN Ic with an early excess in the optical light curves followed by a long (~30 d) rise to the main peak. It is the first spectroscopically-normal double-peaked SN Ic to be observed. Our aim is to determine the properties of this explosion and of its progenitor star. Methods. Optical photometry and spectroscopy of iPTF15dtg was obtained with multiple telescopes. The resulting light curves and spectral sequence are analyzed and modeled with hydrodynamical and analytical models, with particular focus on the early emission. iPTF15dtg is a slow rising SN Ic, similar to SN 2011bm. Hydrodynamical modeling of the bolometric properties reveals a large ejecta mass (~10 Mmore » ) and strong 56Ni mixing. The luminous early emission can be reproduced if we account for the presence of an extended (≳500 R ), low-mass (≳0.045 M ) envelope around the progenitor star. Alternative scenarios for the early peak, such as the interaction with a companion, a shock-breakout (SBO) cooling tail from the progenitor surface, or a magnetar-driven SBO are not favored. In conclusion, the large ejecta mass and the presence of H- and He-free extended material around the star suggest that the progenitor of iPTF15dtg was a massive (≳35 M ) WR star that experienced strong mass loss.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [4];  [5];  [1];  [6];  [3]; ORCiD logo [7]
  1. Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Oskar Klein Centre, Dept. of Astronomy
  2. Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics
  3. Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Particle Physics & Astrophysics
  4. California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Astronomy
  5. California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), La Canada Flintridge, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.
  6. California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Cahill Center for Astrophysics
  7. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program; National Science Foundation (NSF); Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
OSTI Identifier:
1412870
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-27746
Journal ID: ISSN 0004-6361; TRN: US1800385
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Astronomy and Astrophysics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 592; Journal ID: ISSN 0004-6361
Publisher:
EDP Sciences
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; Astronomy and Astrophysics; supernovae general

Citation Formats

Taddia, Francesco, Fremling, C., Sollerman, J., Corsi, A., Gal-Yam, A., Karamehmetoglu, E., Lunnan, R., Bue, B., Ergon, M., Kasliwal, M., Vreeswijk, P. M., and Wozniak, Przemyslaw R. iPTF15dtg: a double-peaked Type Ic supernova from a massive progenitor. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201628703.
Taddia, Francesco, Fremling, C., Sollerman, J., Corsi, A., Gal-Yam, A., Karamehmetoglu, E., Lunnan, R., Bue, B., Ergon, M., Kasliwal, M., Vreeswijk, P. M., & Wozniak, Przemyslaw R. iPTF15dtg: a double-peaked Type Ic supernova from a massive progenitor. United States. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201628703.
Taddia, Francesco, Fremling, C., Sollerman, J., Corsi, A., Gal-Yam, A., Karamehmetoglu, E., Lunnan, R., Bue, B., Ergon, M., Kasliwal, M., Vreeswijk, P. M., and Wozniak, Przemyslaw R. Thu . "iPTF15dtg: a double-peaked Type Ic supernova from a massive progenitor". United States. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201628703. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1412870.
@article{osti_1412870,
title = {iPTF15dtg: a double-peaked Type Ic supernova from a massive progenitor},
author = {Taddia, Francesco and Fremling, C. and Sollerman, J. and Corsi, A. and Gal-Yam, A. and Karamehmetoglu, E. and Lunnan, R. and Bue, B. and Ergon, M. and Kasliwal, M. and Vreeswijk, P. M. and Wozniak, Przemyslaw R.},
abstractNote = {Type Ic supernovae (SNe Ic) arise from the core-collapse of H- (and He-) poor stars, which could either be single Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars or lower-mass stars stripped of their envelope by a companion. Their light curves are radioactively powered and usually show a fast rise to peak (~10-15 d), without any early (in the first few days) emission bumps (with the exception of broad-lined SNe Ic) as sometimes seen for other types of stripped-envelope SNe (e.g., Type IIb SN 1993J and Type Ib SN 2008D). Here, we have studied iPTF15dtg, a spectroscopically normal SN Ic with an early excess in the optical light curves followed by a long (~30 d) rise to the main peak. It is the first spectroscopically-normal double-peaked SN Ic to be observed. Our aim is to determine the properties of this explosion and of its progenitor star. Methods. Optical photometry and spectroscopy of iPTF15dtg was obtained with multiple telescopes. The resulting light curves and spectral sequence are analyzed and modeled with hydrodynamical and analytical models, with particular focus on the early emission. iPTF15dtg is a slow rising SN Ic, similar to SN 2011bm. Hydrodynamical modeling of the bolometric properties reveals a large ejecta mass (~10 M⊙) and strong 56Ni mixing. The luminous early emission can be reproduced if we account for the presence of an extended (≳500 R⊙), low-mass (≳0.045 M⊙) envelope around the progenitor star. Alternative scenarios for the early peak, such as the interaction with a companion, a shock-breakout (SBO) cooling tail from the progenitor surface, or a magnetar-driven SBO are not favored. In conclusion, the large ejecta mass and the presence of H- and He-free extended material around the star suggest that the progenitor of iPTF15dtg was a massive (≳35 M⊙) WR star that experienced strong mass loss.},
doi = {10.1051/0004-6361/201628703},
journal = {Astronomy and Astrophysics},
number = ,
volume = 592,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Aug 04 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Thu Aug 04 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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Cited by: 8works
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  • We present observations of the Type Ic supernova (SN Ic) 2011bm spanning a period of about one year. The data establish that SN 2011bm is a spectroscopically normal SN Ic with moderately low ejecta velocities and with a very slow spectroscopic and photometric evolution (more than twice as slow as SN 1998bw). The Pan-STARRS1 retrospective detection shows that the rise time from explosion to peak was {approx}40 days in the R band. Through an analysis of the light curve and the spectral sequence, we estimate a kinetic energy of {approx}7-17 foe and a total ejected mass of {approx}7-17 M{sub Sunmore » }, 5-10 M{sub Sun} of which is oxygen and 0.6-0.7 M{sub Sun} is {sup 56}Ni. The physical parameters obtained for SN 2011bm suggest that its progenitor was a massive star of initial mass 30-50 M{sub Sun }. The profile of the forbidden oxygen lines in the nebular spectra shows no evidence of a bi-polar geometry in the ejected material.« less
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