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Title: Demonstration of Vaisala Prototype Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Field Campaign Report

Abstract

Continuous water vapor profiling within the atmospheric boundary layer is a major unmet measurement requirement for improving weather analysis and prediction. Humidity profile information can be used in mesoscale numerical models for severe weather prediction, flash flood prediction, energy management, and other applications. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility has conducted several experiments at its Southern Great Plains (SGP) observatory in North Central Oklahoma to test and develop techniques for tropospheric water vapor measurements (Turner et al. 2016). This campaign concentrated on a new compact water vapor DIAL (DIfferential Absorption Lidar) instrument that the instrument manufacturer Vaisala has recently developed using a ceilometer-type telescope design (Dabberdt 2016, Roininen,2017). The DIAL system uses eye-safe class 1M semiconductor laser sources in the sub-micron wavelength range. The instrument reports water vapor mixing ratio profiles up to 3000 m within the atmospheric boundary layer, or up to the cloud base, whichever is lower. The purpose of the campaign was to test the Vaisala DIAL prototype (Figure 1) in high-humidity convective conditions at the ARM SGP site, comparing measurements against other instrumentation at the site (Münkel and Roininen 2017). Comparisons were made against Raman lidar and RS92 radiosondemore » observations of water vapor mixing ratio profiles. The same DIAL prototype has previously been tested in campaigns in Central and Northern Europe (Roininen et al. 2016). The ARM campaign was a collaboration between Vaisala and researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The DIAL was located next to the Raman lidar at the ARM SGP site (Figure 2). Two Vaisala employees visited the site for the installation work, which was carried out on May 15, 2017.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [5];
  1. Vaisala Oyj
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  3. Earth System Research Laboratory, NOAA
  4. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  5. Vaisala GmbH
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOE Office of Science Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Contributing Org.:
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Vaisala, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory
OSTI Identifier:
1412535
Report Number(s):
DOE/SC-ARM-17-037
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-ACO5-7601830
Resource Type:
Program Document
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Southern Great Plains, Raman lidar, planetary boundary layer, water vapor, radiosondes

Citation Formats

Roininen, Reijo, Newsom, Rob, Gustafson, William, Turner, David D, Li, Zhijin, Lehtinen, Raisa, Munkel, Christoph, and Alaranta, Simo. Demonstration of Vaisala Prototype Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Field Campaign Report. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Roininen, Reijo, Newsom, Rob, Gustafson, William, Turner, David D, Li, Zhijin, Lehtinen, Raisa, Munkel, Christoph, & Alaranta, Simo. Demonstration of Vaisala Prototype Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Field Campaign Report. United States.
Roininen, Reijo, Newsom, Rob, Gustafson, William, Turner, David D, Li, Zhijin, Lehtinen, Raisa, Munkel, Christoph, and Alaranta, Simo. Mon . "Demonstration of Vaisala Prototype Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Field Campaign Report". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1412535.
@article{osti_1412535,
title = {Demonstration of Vaisala Prototype Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Field Campaign Report},
author = {Roininen, Reijo and Newsom, Rob and Gustafson, William and Turner, David D and Li, Zhijin and Lehtinen, Raisa and Munkel, Christoph and Alaranta, Simo},
abstractNote = {Continuous water vapor profiling within the atmospheric boundary layer is a major unmet measurement requirement for improving weather analysis and prediction. Humidity profile information can be used in mesoscale numerical models for severe weather prediction, flash flood prediction, energy management, and other applications. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility has conducted several experiments at its Southern Great Plains (SGP) observatory in North Central Oklahoma to test and develop techniques for tropospheric water vapor measurements (Turner et al. 2016). This campaign concentrated on a new compact water vapor DIAL (DIfferential Absorption Lidar) instrument that the instrument manufacturer Vaisala has recently developed using a ceilometer-type telescope design (Dabberdt 2016, Roininen,2017). The DIAL system uses eye-safe class 1M semiconductor laser sources in the sub-micron wavelength range. The instrument reports water vapor mixing ratio profiles up to 3000 m within the atmospheric boundary layer, or up to the cloud base, whichever is lower. The purpose of the campaign was to test the Vaisala DIAL prototype (Figure 1) in high-humidity convective conditions at the ARM SGP site, comparing measurements against other instrumentation at the site (Münkel and Roininen 2017). Comparisons were made against Raman lidar and RS92 radiosonde observations of water vapor mixing ratio profiles. The same DIAL prototype has previously been tested in campaigns in Central and Northern Europe (Roininen et al. 2016). The ARM campaign was a collaboration between Vaisala and researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The DIAL was located next to the Raman lidar at the ARM SGP site (Figure 2). Two Vaisala employees visited the site for the installation work, which was carried out on May 15, 2017.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}

Program Document:
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