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Title: Understanding the structural drivers governing glass–water interactions in borosilicate based model bioactive glasses

Abstract

The concept of designing third-generation bioactive glasses for tissue engineering is based on the principle of providing a scaffold (i.e., structural support) and chemical conditions (i.e., ionic dissolution products) that initiate a synchronized sequence of cell level responses that result in the expression of genes required for living tissues regeneration. Realizing the goal of designing these glasses requires a thorough understanding of the complex sequence of reactions that control their rate of degradation (when in contact with physiological fluids) and the structural drivers that control them. While there is considerable amount of literature published on chemical dissolution behavior and apatite-forming ability of potentially bioactive glasses, the majority of data published to date has been produced using different experimental and measurement protocols. As a result, intercomparison of different datasets reveals inconsistencies between experimental groups. In this article, we have highlighted some major experimental challenges and choices that need to be carefully navigated in order to unearth the mechanisms governing the chemical dissolution behavior of bioactive glasses and to accurately understand the composition-structure-property relationships. Accordingly, a borosilicate based melt-quenched model bioactive glass system has been used to demonstrate the impact of thermal history on the structure and chemical dissolution behavior of glasses.more » The impact of thermal history on glass structure has been studied using 23Na, 11B, and 29Si magic angle spinning - nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy and fictive temperature measurements. The dissolution behavior of glasses in deionized water has been followed by inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The dissolution experiments have been designed using surface area of glass powder - to - volume of solution (SA/V) approach instead of the ratio of mass of sample - to - volume of solution (typically used in bioactive glass studies). This approach not only allows us to draw a rigorous correlation between the molecular structure of glasses with their degradation behavior, but the data obtained using this approach can also be used to develop non-empirical predictive models for design of next generation bioactive glass compositions.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. The State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. Corning Inc., Corning, NY (United States)
  4. Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1412057
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Acta Biomaterialia
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 65; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 1742-7061
Publisher:
Acta Materialia, Inc.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Bioactive glass; Dissolution; Thermal history; Structure

Citation Formats

Stone-Weiss, Nicholas, Pierce, Eric M., Youngman, Randall E., Gulbiten, Ozgur, Smith, Nicholas J., Du, Jincheng, and Goel, Ashutosh. Understanding the structural drivers governing glass–water interactions in borosilicate based model bioactive glasses. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.actbio.2017.11.006.
Stone-Weiss, Nicholas, Pierce, Eric M., Youngman, Randall E., Gulbiten, Ozgur, Smith, Nicholas J., Du, Jincheng, & Goel, Ashutosh. Understanding the structural drivers governing glass–water interactions in borosilicate based model bioactive glasses. United States. doi:10.1016/j.actbio.2017.11.006.
Stone-Weiss, Nicholas, Pierce, Eric M., Youngman, Randall E., Gulbiten, Ozgur, Smith, Nicholas J., Du, Jincheng, and Goel, Ashutosh. Tue . "Understanding the structural drivers governing glass–water interactions in borosilicate based model bioactive glasses". United States. doi:10.1016/j.actbio.2017.11.006.
@article{osti_1412057,
title = {Understanding the structural drivers governing glass–water interactions in borosilicate based model bioactive glasses},
author = {Stone-Weiss, Nicholas and Pierce, Eric M. and Youngman, Randall E. and Gulbiten, Ozgur and Smith, Nicholas J. and Du, Jincheng and Goel, Ashutosh},
abstractNote = {The concept of designing third-generation bioactive glasses for tissue engineering is based on the principle of providing a scaffold (i.e., structural support) and chemical conditions (i.e., ionic dissolution products) that initiate a synchronized sequence of cell level responses that result in the expression of genes required for living tissues regeneration. Realizing the goal of designing these glasses requires a thorough understanding of the complex sequence of reactions that control their rate of degradation (when in contact with physiological fluids) and the structural drivers that control them. While there is considerable amount of literature published on chemical dissolution behavior and apatite-forming ability of potentially bioactive glasses, the majority of data published to date has been produced using different experimental and measurement protocols. As a result, intercomparison of different datasets reveals inconsistencies between experimental groups. In this article, we have highlighted some major experimental challenges and choices that need to be carefully navigated in order to unearth the mechanisms governing the chemical dissolution behavior of bioactive glasses and to accurately understand the composition-structure-property relationships. Accordingly, a borosilicate based melt-quenched model bioactive glass system has been used to demonstrate the impact of thermal history on the structure and chemical dissolution behavior of glasses. The impact of thermal history on glass structure has been studied using 23Na, 11B, and 29Si magic angle spinning - nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy and fictive temperature measurements. The dissolution behavior of glasses in deionized water has been followed by inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The dissolution experiments have been designed using surface area of glass powder - to - volume of solution (SA/V) approach instead of the ratio of mass of sample - to - volume of solution (typically used in bioactive glass studies). This approach not only allows us to draw a rigorous correlation between the molecular structure of glasses with their degradation behavior, but the data obtained using this approach can also be used to develop non-empirical predictive models for design of next generation bioactive glass compositions.},
doi = {10.1016/j.actbio.2017.11.006},
journal = {Acta Biomaterialia},
issn = {1742-7061},
number = C,
volume = 65,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {11}
}