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Title: Operating strategies to minimize degradation in fuel cell gas turbine hybrids

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1412016
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Energy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 192; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-12-08 16:21:17; Journal ID: ISSN 0306-2619
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Zaccaria, V., Tucker, D., and Traverso, A. Operating strategies to minimize degradation in fuel cell gas turbine hybrids. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.10.098.
Zaccaria, V., Tucker, D., & Traverso, A. Operating strategies to minimize degradation in fuel cell gas turbine hybrids. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.10.098.
Zaccaria, V., Tucker, D., and Traverso, A. Sat . "Operating strategies to minimize degradation in fuel cell gas turbine hybrids". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.10.098.
@article{osti_1412016,
title = {Operating strategies to minimize degradation in fuel cell gas turbine hybrids},
author = {Zaccaria, V. and Tucker, D. and Traverso, A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.10.098},
journal = {Applied Energy},
number = C,
volume = 192,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.10.098

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Abstract not provided.
  • The energy conversion efficiency can be improved if immediate contact of air and fuel is prevented. One means to prevent this immediate contact is the use of fuel cell technology. High-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) have many features that make them attractive for utility and industrial applications. However, in view of their high operating temperatures and the incomplete nature of the fuel oxidation process, such fuel cells must be combined with conventional power generation technology to develop power plant configurations that are both functional and efficient. Most fuel cell cycles proposed in the literature use a high-temperature fuel cellmore » running at ambient pressure and a steam bottoming cycle to recover the waste heat generated by the fuel cell. With such cycles, the inherent flexibility and shorter start-up time characteristics of the fuel cell are lost. In Part 1 of this paper, a pressurized cycle using a solid oxide fuel cell and an integrated gas turbine bottoming cycle was presented. The cycle is simpler than most cycles with steam bottoming cycles and more suited to flexible power generation. In this paper, the authors will discuss this cycle in more detail, with an in-depth discussion of all cycle component characteristics and losses. In particular, they will make use of the fuel cell's internal fuel reforming capability. The optimal cycle parameters were obtained based on calculations performed using Aspen Technology's ASPEN PLUS process simulation software and a fuel cell simulator developed by Argonne National Laboratory. The efficiency of the proposed cycle is 68.1%. A preliminary economic assessment of the cycle shows that it should compare favorable with a state-of-the-art combined cycle plant on a cost per MWe basis.« less
  • The energy conversion efficiency of the combustion process can be improved if immediate contact of fuel and oxygen is prevent4ed and an oxygen carrier is used. In a previous paper (Harvey et al., 1992), a gas turbine cycle was investigated in which part of the exhaust gases are recycled and used as oxygen-carrying components. For the optimized process, a theoretical thermal efficiency of 66.3% was achieved, based on the lower heating value (LHV) of the methane fuel. One means to further improve the exergetic efficiency of a power cycle is to utilize fuel cell technology. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC)more » have many features that make them attractive for utility and industrial applications. In this paper, the authors will therefore consider SOFC technology. In view of their high operating temperatures and the incomplete nature of the fuel oxidation process, fuel cells must be combined with conventional power generation technology to develop power plant configurations that are both functional and efficient. In this paper, the authors will show how monolithic SOFC (MSOFC) technology may be integrated into the previously described gas turbine cycle using recycled exhaust gases as oxygen carriers. An optimized cycle configuration will be presented based upon a detailed cycle analysis performance using Aspen Plus[trademark] process simulation software and a MSOFC fuel cell simulator developed by Argonne National Labs. The optimized cycle achieves a theoretical thermal efficiency of 77.7%, based on the LHV of the fuel.« less