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Title: Methanogenesis in oxygenated soils is a substantial fraction of wetland methane emissions

Abstract

The current paradigm, widely incorporated in soil biogeochemical models, is that microbial methanogenesis can only occur in anoxic habitats1-4. In contrast, here porewater and greenhouse-gas flux measurements show clear evidence for methane production in well-oxygenated soils from a freshwater wetland. A comparison of oxic to anoxic soils revealed up to ten times greater methane production and nine times more methanogenesis activity in oxygenated soils. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing recovered the first near complete genomes for a novel methanogen species, and showed acetoclastic production from this organism was the dominant methanogenesis pathway in oxygenated soils. This organism, Candidatus Methanosaeta oxydurans, is prevalent across methane emitting ecosystems, suggesting a global significance. Moreover, in this wetland, we estimated that a dominant fraction of methane fluxes could be attributed to methanogenesis in oxygenated soils. Together our findings challenge a widely-held assumption about methanogenesis, with significant ramifications for global methane estimates and Earth system modeling.

Authors:
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Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1411889
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-125731
Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723; 48859; KP1704020
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nature Communications; Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Angle, Jordan C., Morin, Timothy H., Solden, Lindsey M., Narrowe, Adrienne B., Smith, Garrett J., Borton, Mikayla A., Rey-Sanchez, Camilo, Daly, Rebecca A., Mirfenderesgi, Golnazalsdat, Hoyt, David W., Riley, William J., Miller, Christopher S., Bohrer, Gil, and Wrighton, Kelly C. Methanogenesis in oxygenated soils is a substantial fraction of wetland methane emissions. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01753-4.
Angle, Jordan C., Morin, Timothy H., Solden, Lindsey M., Narrowe, Adrienne B., Smith, Garrett J., Borton, Mikayla A., Rey-Sanchez, Camilo, Daly, Rebecca A., Mirfenderesgi, Golnazalsdat, Hoyt, David W., Riley, William J., Miller, Christopher S., Bohrer, Gil, & Wrighton, Kelly C. Methanogenesis in oxygenated soils is a substantial fraction of wetland methane emissions. United States. doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01753-4.
Angle, Jordan C., Morin, Timothy H., Solden, Lindsey M., Narrowe, Adrienne B., Smith, Garrett J., Borton, Mikayla A., Rey-Sanchez, Camilo, Daly, Rebecca A., Mirfenderesgi, Golnazalsdat, Hoyt, David W., Riley, William J., Miller, Christopher S., Bohrer, Gil, and Wrighton, Kelly C. Thu . "Methanogenesis in oxygenated soils is a substantial fraction of wetland methane emissions". United States. doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01753-4.
@article{osti_1411889,
title = {Methanogenesis in oxygenated soils is a substantial fraction of wetland methane emissions},
author = {Angle, Jordan C. and Morin, Timothy H. and Solden, Lindsey M. and Narrowe, Adrienne B. and Smith, Garrett J. and Borton, Mikayla A. and Rey-Sanchez, Camilo and Daly, Rebecca A. and Mirfenderesgi, Golnazalsdat and Hoyt, David W. and Riley, William J. and Miller, Christopher S. and Bohrer, Gil and Wrighton, Kelly C.},
abstractNote = {The current paradigm, widely incorporated in soil biogeochemical models, is that microbial methanogenesis can only occur in anoxic habitats1-4. In contrast, here porewater and greenhouse-gas flux measurements show clear evidence for methane production in well-oxygenated soils from a freshwater wetland. A comparison of oxic to anoxic soils revealed up to ten times greater methane production and nine times more methanogenesis activity in oxygenated soils. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing recovered the first near complete genomes for a novel methanogen species, and showed acetoclastic production from this organism was the dominant methanogenesis pathway in oxygenated soils. This organism, Candidatus Methanosaeta oxydurans, is prevalent across methane emitting ecosystems, suggesting a global significance. Moreover, in this wetland, we estimated that a dominant fraction of methane fluxes could be attributed to methanogenesis in oxygenated soils. Together our findings challenge a widely-held assumption about methanogenesis, with significant ramifications for global methane estimates and Earth system modeling.},
doi = {10.1038/s41467-017-01753-4},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = 1,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Nov 16 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Nov 16 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}