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Title: Open stack thermal battery tests

Abstract

We present selected results from a series of Open Stack thermal battery tests performed in FY14 and FY15 and discuss our findings. These tests were meant to provide validation data for the comprehensive thermal battery simulation tools currently under development in Sierra/Aria under known conditions compared with as-manufactured batteries. We are able to satisfy this original objective in the present study for some test conditions. Measurements from each test include: nominal stack pressure (axial stress) vs. time in the cold state and during battery ignition, battery voltage vs. time against a prescribed current draw with periodic pulses, and images transverse to the battery axis from which cell displacements are computed. Six battery configurations were evaluated: 3, 5, and 10 cell stacks sandwiched between 4 layers of the materials used for axial thermal insulation, either Fiberfrax Board or MinK. In addition to the results from 3, 5, and 10 cell stacks with either in-line Fiberfrax Board or MinK insulation, a series of cell-free “control” tests were performed that show the inherent settling and stress relaxation based on the interaction between the insulation and heat pellets alone.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1411884
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-3953
657781
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE

Citation Formats

Long, Kevin N., Roberts, Christine C., Grillet, Anne M., Headley, Alexander J., Fenton, Kyle, Wong, Dennis, and Ingersoll, David. Open stack thermal battery tests. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1411884.
Long, Kevin N., Roberts, Christine C., Grillet, Anne M., Headley, Alexander J., Fenton, Kyle, Wong, Dennis, & Ingersoll, David. Open stack thermal battery tests. United States. doi:10.2172/1411884.
Long, Kevin N., Roberts, Christine C., Grillet, Anne M., Headley, Alexander J., Fenton, Kyle, Wong, Dennis, and Ingersoll, David. Mon . "Open stack thermal battery tests". United States. doi:10.2172/1411884. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1411884.
@article{osti_1411884,
title = {Open stack thermal battery tests},
author = {Long, Kevin N. and Roberts, Christine C. and Grillet, Anne M. and Headley, Alexander J. and Fenton, Kyle and Wong, Dennis and Ingersoll, David},
abstractNote = {We present selected results from a series of Open Stack thermal battery tests performed in FY14 and FY15 and discuss our findings. These tests were meant to provide validation data for the comprehensive thermal battery simulation tools currently under development in Sierra/Aria under known conditions compared with as-manufactured batteries. We are able to satisfy this original objective in the present study for some test conditions. Measurements from each test include: nominal stack pressure (axial stress) vs. time in the cold state and during battery ignition, battery voltage vs. time against a prescribed current draw with periodic pulses, and images transverse to the battery axis from which cell displacements are computed. Six battery configurations were evaluated: 3, 5, and 10 cell stacks sandwiched between 4 layers of the materials used for axial thermal insulation, either Fiberfrax Board or MinK. In addition to the results from 3, 5, and 10 cell stacks with either in-line Fiberfrax Board or MinK insulation, a series of cell-free “control” tests were performed that show the inherent settling and stress relaxation based on the interaction between the insulation and heat pellets alone.},
doi = {10.2172/1411884},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 17 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Apr 17 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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