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Title: The Value of Transparency in Distributed Solar PV Markets

Abstract

Market transparency refers to the degree of customer awareness of product options and fair market prices for a given good. In The Value of Transparency in Distributed Solar PV Markets, we use residential solar photovoltaic (PV) quote data to study the value of transparency in distributed solar PV markets. We find that improved market transparency results in lower installation offer prices. Further, the results of this study suggest that PV customers benefit from gaining access to more PV quotes.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1411855
Report Number(s):
NREL/FS-6A20-70201
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; solar; markets; competition; transparency

Citation Formats

OShaughnessy, Eric J, and Zamzam, Ahmed S. The Value of Transparency in Distributed Solar PV Markets. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
OShaughnessy, Eric J, & Zamzam, Ahmed S. The Value of Transparency in Distributed Solar PV Markets. United States.
OShaughnessy, Eric J, and Zamzam, Ahmed S. 2017. "The Value of Transparency in Distributed Solar PV Markets". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1411855.
@article{osti_1411855,
title = {The Value of Transparency in Distributed Solar PV Markets},
author = {OShaughnessy, Eric J and Zamzam, Ahmed S},
abstractNote = {Market transparency refers to the degree of customer awareness of product options and fair market prices for a given good. In The Value of Transparency in Distributed Solar PV Markets, we use residential solar photovoltaic (PV) quote data to study the value of transparency in distributed solar PV markets. We find that improved market transparency results in lower installation offer prices. Further, the results of this study suggest that PV customers benefit from gaining access to more PV quotes.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}
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